Author Topic: Canadian healthcare  (Read 867 times)

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Offline The Cynic

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Re: Canadian healthcare
« Reply #75 on: October 12, 2021, 03:28:19 pm »
That might be the intent but common knowledge says you can speed up your passage thru or into the health system by showing up at ER.

My doctor told me in July to go to the ER to get a referral. He said if he gave me one it would take forever. I did and they did. And when I called the specialist's office they gave me an appointment for, well, October. When I suggested that was far off she said and I quote "If you hadn't come through ER I'm making appointments for people for March right now."

Offline waldo

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Re: Canadian healthcare
« Reply #76 on: October 13, 2021, 12:01:35 am »
What a lovely and completely anonymous "source" you have produced! And what does it say? What does it say??? Why... why it says that the NP article was correct and the US has twice as many ICU beds as we do!! How kind of you to post one of your pretty graphics to support my own point!

that's heelarious given the fact to get information/source references for the graphed data in your provided 'statistica links', one has to pay/subscribe to purchase an account @$39 annual fee! LOL!

but hey now, my reply wasn't focused on the NP reference to the U.S. ICU bed number... no, it was a direct response to your statement/claim concerning, "international comparisons... ALL showing"! LOL! What a moron you are!
As for international comparisons, they seem to all show we have a lot fewer hospital beds and doctors than pretty much everyone.

you also have selective grasp on the rest of my posts that emphasize that legitimate and proper international comparisons require standardized criteria... and that, "American ICU beds are often defined by staffing availability... rather than functional & technical capabilities."

as much as the waldo tried to impress upon you that legitimate country comparisons require standardized criteria, your peaBrain clearly couldn't grasp the concept! Here have another: many countries consider an ICU bed... define an ICU bed, as one in which a patient can receive mechanical ventilation. This definition is by no means universal, is by no means standardized as is evidenced by, for example, American ICU beds are often defined by staffing availability.

Offline waldo

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Re: Canadian healthcare
« Reply #77 on: October 13, 2021, 12:35:28 am »
your blustering doesn't deflect from the fact you so struggle with facts/details... as in you have none and you provide none! Let the waldo school you further:

=> the latest request from provincial premiers asking the federal government for an increase to health transfers was presented this past March, albeit it was initially presented last 2020 fall... something about that pandemic thingee acted to constrain the federal government - you know, that $1 billion spent on vaccines, the $25 billion in direct funding to the provinces to, among other things, bolster their health systems, etc..

=> as it stands, the 2021-2022 federal government health transfer to the provinces will amount to ~$43 billion for health care, under an existing agreement that sees the amount rise by at least 3% per year.

=> the provincial premiers March 2021 request asks for a $28 billion increase to the 2021-2022 federal government health transfer rising by $4 billion each subsequent year after (an effective 6% increase a year thereafter).

=> the provincial premiers maintain the 2021-2011 ~$43 billion health transfer amount represents only 22% of overall provincial healthcare costs... and that the increase request will position the federal government to contribute 35% to the overall provincial healthcare costs.

the waldo shining a light: there is a need for {some} provinces to ALSO step-up their own game in funding health care in their respective provinces; for example: Albertans pay no user fees for health services; Albertans have the lowest provincial tax rate in Canada; Albertans have no provincial sales tax.

=> waldo historical reference point: in 2011, Harper Conservatives set in place 6% health care transfer increases that would remain in effect until 2016-17, after which it would grow at a minimum of 3%, or a 3-year average of economic growth, whichever is higher. The Trudeau Liberal government has maintained that formula; since 2017-18, the increase has grown by an average of 3.64%.

=> in line with an election platform policy point, the Liberal federal government has proposed an increase of $25 billion in new health funding... with conditions that reflect upon said platform policy point; some of which are referenced in this graphic the waldo previously posted:

Are you going to try to tell us oh propaganda-minister, that the premiers didn't ask for more health care funding in 2019 and 2018 and 2017 and 2016 and 2015? Really? Seriously? {waldo: Harper Conservative funding transfer equation and related escalator carried on through to 2016-2017... the current federal government has carried forward with those same numbers. As the waldo is aware, a Premiers meeting in the fall 2020 brought forward a request for $28 billion in increased health care funding... that same request was again presented in March 2021. The current federal government has responded with a proposal to increase funding by $25 billion. Now, if you're aware of any other requests between 2018 and 2020, don't hesitate to provide that information... rather than the empty nothingness you continue to present!}

Short term emergency funding, not for continuing care or hiring more doctors or building more hospitals. {waldo: yes, the federal government proposal currently includes conditions on how the money can be spent. In this regard the federal government wants to realize defined outcomes rather than continuing with the blank cheque wants of the Premiers. Defined outcomes - what a concept hey lil' buddy - what a concept!}

{waldo: => as it stands, the 2021-2022 federal government health transfer to the provinces will amount to ~$43 billion for health care, under an existing agreement that sees the amount rise by at least 3% per year.}
That's so generous of your party. Why, it's almost as much as the rate of inflation and will slow down the deterioration of the health care system... slightly! I mean, our population is aging and you guys are bringing in a half million people a year to add to the burden. Oh and by the by, given the tremendous level of borrowing by your party inflation is on the rise, which means almost all of any increase will be eaten up by the inflation you're causing! Hey! {waldo: again, that's the transfer number/escalator per Harper Conservatives. Again, the provincial premiers March 2021 request asks for a $28 billion increase to the 2021-2022 federal government health transfer - the federal government has responded with a proposal that includes a $25 billion transfer increase - with conditions on how the money will be spent. Your nattering on about inflation is stoopid & ignorant, particularly as you clearly don't recognize the role/management of the Bank of Canada in regards the current 2% inflation rate target.}