Author Topic: Canadian healthcare  (Read 2494 times)

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Offline waldo

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Re: Canadian healthcare
« Reply #61 on: October 10, 2021, 11:49:36 pm »
no - your "minor cases" have no reason to be clogging up ERs... your simpleton call for "more ER doctors & nurses" to manage improper use of ERs is woefully misplaced... misdirected!
Why, you state that as if you have access to important knowledge. So let's hear it. Let's have that important, expert knowledge you have which allows you to render such judgement. A judgement you make without explanation, I note.

only a dumbazz would double-down on it being acceptable to use hospital ERs as an alternate... as a substitute for primary physician care.
Only a retarded Liberal drone would think he could get away with switching goalposts mid-discussion. The discussion was about ER's or clinics

again, only a dumbazz would continue to claim hospital ERs used for non-emergency conditions & concerns is an appropriate/proper use rather than one that compromises the intent & purpose of hospital ERs.

Offline waldo

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Re: Canadian healthcare
« Reply #62 on: October 10, 2021, 11:58:35 pm »
The premiers are asking for the feds to increase their share of health costs. Nothing about that in the Liberal playbook.

you simpleton! Negotiations are in the works... the wait was on the Premiers to get their act together and present a number. As it stands, that number is quite close to what the federal government has in-turn proposed. However, it seems the Premiers are a tad touchy about conditions being applied to their blank cheque want. If you were actually in the know on this subject, you would have provided the numbers and related details... but of course, per your barkingNormSelf you showcase your lack of knowledge in the matter. Perhaps try again - but try harder, hey!

Offline waldo

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Re: Canadian healthcare
« Reply #63 on: October 11, 2021, 01:08:03 am »
good on ya! You calling for increased ICU capacity to help offset the consequences of failed pandemic related actions taken by Conservative Premiers/Conservative provincial governments is key in recognizing causal attachments and properly attributing critical review accountability and responsibilities - good on ya!
You Liberal hacks always return to attacking the West, but every province has the same problem with lack of ICU beds, lack of hospital beds, and lack of doctors, including Ontario, which was a Liberal fiefdom for 15 years.
That was painful to read, but every Canadian should.

the one thing that NP article got right was to emphasize the failed Alberta situation... to showcase Conservative Kenny/UCP's wayToSoon moronic moves to stop all restrictions and testing protocols so he could act to declare, "Alberta Was Open For Summer... For The Best Summer Ever". Of course Kenny's pardner, Conservative Premier Moe, did the same for Saskatchewan! The waldo reads that Alberta and Saskatchewan have 15% of the Canadian population and at the worst, 55% of COVID hospitalizations! Notwithstanding when Kenney all but declared the pandemic was over, Alberta vaccination numbers stalled out to the point of Alberta being the least vaccinated province in Canada! 

it's dubious at best to presume to use the failed Conservative Premiers pandemic actions as the rationale to substantiate creating ICU beds that would otherwise not be needed. More pointedly, in order to facilitate proper research and ensure rigorous country comparisons of ICU numbers, comparison criteria must be internationally recognized and standardized... like the definition of critical care, staff to patient ratios and whether staff are dedicated to more than one patient, the ability to provide organ support, to provide for variable staffing, to recognize the impact of patient discharge practices, national population demographics, hospital size and location, and regionalization of care, etc., etc., etc..

after the waldo's cursory look at that NP article, as befits typical NP lack of rigour, broad generalization and questionable sources, I don't see any studies mentioned; notwithstanding the article author's short bio suggests he's nothing more than a political staffer... and certainly has no medical experience or knowledge/training!


Offline BC_cheque

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Re: Canadian healthcare
« Reply #64 on: October 11, 2021, 03:08:10 pm »
I posted on the wrong board.  Delete.
« Last Edit: October 11, 2021, 03:14:39 pm by BC_cheque »

Offline The Cynic

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Re: Canadian healthcare
« Reply #65 on: October 11, 2021, 04:42:45 pm »
again, only a dumbazz would continue to claim hospital ERs used for non-emergency conditions & concerns is an appropriate/proper use rather than one that compromises the intent & purpose of hospital ERs.

Why?

Explain it, WALL-E. Flaunt your mighty Liberal logic! Show the lowly me why I'm so very wrong!

Unless of course you're all mouth.

Offline The Cynic

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Re: Canadian healthcare
« Reply #66 on: October 11, 2021, 04:44:54 pm »
you simpleton! Negotiations are in the works... the wait was on the Premiers to get their act together and present a number. As it stands, that number is quite close to what the federal government has in-turn proposed. However, it seems the Premiers are a tad touchy about conditions being applied to their blank cheque want. If you were actually in the know on this subject, you would have provided the numbers and related details... but of course, per your barkingNormSelf you showcase your lack of knowledge in the matter. Perhaps try again - but try harder, hey!

How rude! Am I upsetting you, WALL-E? Are you fuming and fulminating? Are your eyes bulging as you pound wildly on the keyboard?

Negations are in the works? Uhmmm huhmmm. For how many years now, WALL-E? The premiers have been complaining about the need for more money since your beloved Mr. Blackface got elected.

Offline The Cynic

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Re: Canadian healthcare
« Reply #67 on: October 11, 2021, 04:54:43 pm »
the one thing that NP article got right was to emphasize the failed Alberta situation... to showcase Conservative Kenny/

Wally, Wally Wally. You weaselly little half man! You always return to attacking the other guy. Is it because your own guy is simply indefensible? You can't bear to talk about him? As the article pointed out, this is not just an Alberta problem. Perhaps you forgot the part where it pointed out the poorest US state has more ICU capacity than any Canadian province? The only provinces which haven't approached disaster are the ones which isolated themselves from the country - so your beloved Mr. Blackface's continued stream of foreigners gleefully piling off aircraft from China and India without any health checks or quarantines couldn't get their new and ever more dangerous variants into the Atlantic area.

As for international comparisons, they seem to all show we have a lot fewer hospital beds and doctors than pretty much everyone.


Offline waldo

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Re: Canadian healthcare
« Reply #68 on: October 12, 2021, 12:15:53 am »
again, only a dumbazz would continue to claim hospital ERs used for non-emergency conditions & concerns is an appropriate/proper use rather than one that compromises the intent & purpose of hospital ERs.
Why? Explain it. Flaunt your mighty Liberal logic! Show the lowly me why I'm so very wrong! Unless of course you're all mouth.

you struggle so with common sense: obviously the intent of hospital ERs is to provide trauma and emergency services for people in imminent danger of losing their life or suffering permanent damage to their health. Only in your alternate reality does it make sense to have people use hospital emergency departments for non-urgent care and for conditions that could be... that should be... treated in a primary care setting. If you'd like to substantively make/prove your premise, please provide citation/reference support to that end. Thanks in advance!



Offline waldo

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Re: Canadian healthcare
« Reply #69 on: October 12, 2021, 01:21:20 am »
The premiers are asking for the feds to increase their share of health costs. Nothing about that in the Liberal playbook.
you simpleton! Negotiations are in the works... the wait was on the Premiers to get their act together and present a number. As it stands, that number is quite close to what the federal government has in-turn proposed. However, it seems the Premiers are a tad touchy about conditions being applied to their blank cheque want. If you were actually in the know on this subject, you would have provided the numbers and related details... but of course, per your barkingNormSelf you showcase your lack of knowledge in the matter. Perhaps try again - but try harder, hey!
Negations are in the works? Uhmmm huhmmm. For how many years now?

your blustering doesn't deflect from the fact you so struggle with facts/details... as in you have none and you provide none! Let the waldo school you further:

=> the latest request from provincial premiers asking the federal government for an increase to health transfers was presented this past March, albeit it was initially presented last 2020 fall... something about that pandemic thingee acted to constrain the federal government - you know, that $1 billion spent on vaccines, the $25 billion in direct funding to the provinces to, among other things, bolster their health systems, etc..

=> as it stands, the 2021-2022 federal government health transfer to the provinces will amount to ~$43 billion for health care, under an existing agreement that sees the amount rise by at least 3% per year.

=> the provincial premiers March 2021 request asks for a $28 billion increase to the 2021-2022 federal government health transfer rising by $4 billion each subsequent year after (an effective 6% increase a year thereafter).

=> the provincial premiers maintain the 2021-2011 ~$43 billion health transfer amount represents only 22% of overall provincial healthcare costs... and that the increase request will position the federal government to contribute 35% to the overall provincial healthcare costs.

the waldo shining a light: there is a need for {some} provinces to ALSO step-up their own game in funding health care in their respective provinces; for example: Albertans pay no user fees for health services; Albertans have the lowest provincial tax rate in Canada; Albertans have no provincial sales tax.

=> waldo historical reference point: in 2011, Harper Conservatives set in place 6% health care transfer increases that would remain in effect until 2016-17, after which it would grow at a minimum of 3%, or a 3-year average of economic growth, whichever is higher. The Trudeau Liberal government has maintained that formula; since 2017-18, the increase has grown by an average of 3.64%.

=> in line with an election platform policy point, the Liberal federal government has proposed an increase of $25 billion in new health funding... with conditions that reflect upon said platform policy point; some of which are referenced in this graphic the waldo previously posted:



you're welcome lil' buddy - you're welcome!

Offline waldo

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Re: Canadian healthcare
« Reply #70 on: October 12, 2021, 01:40:09 am »
the one thing that NP article got right was to emphasize the failed Alberta situation... to showcase Conservative Kenny/UCP's wayToSoon moronic moves to stop all restrictions and testing protocols so he could act to declare, "Alberta Was Open For Summer... For The Best Summer Ever". Of course Kenny's pardner, Conservative Premier Moe, did the same for Saskatchewan! The waldo reads that Alberta and Saskatchewan have 15% of the Canadian population and at the worst, 55% of COVID hospitalizations! Notwithstanding when Kenney all but declared the pandemic was over, Alberta vaccination numbers stalled out to the point of Alberta being the least vaccinated province in Canada! 

it's dubious at best to presume to use the failed Conservative Premiers pandemic actions as the rationale to substantiate creating ICU beds that would otherwise not be needed. More pointedly, in order to facilitate proper research and ensure rigorous country comparisons of ICU numbers, comparison criteria must be internationally recognized and standardized... like the definition of critical care, staff to patient ratios and whether staff are dedicated to more than one patient, the ability to provide organ support, to provide for variable staffing, to recognize the impact of patient discharge practices, national population demographics, hospital size and location, and regionalization of care, etc., etc., etc..

after the waldo's cursory look at that NP article, as befits typical NP lack of rigour, broad generalization and questionable sources, I don't see any studies mentioned; notwithstanding the article author's short bio suggests he's nothing more than a political staffer... and certainly has no medical experience or knowledge/training!


As for international comparisons, they seem to all show we have a lot fewer hospital beds and doctors than pretty much everyone.

you've got so little game, the waldo is bored with your blustering and inability to present substantive detail to support your madBarking nothingness. Oh wait... my crack research team wants to throw you a bone in response to your claim that, "they seem to all show" - LOL!


as much as the waldo tried to impress upon you that legitimate country comparisons require standardized criteria, your peaBrain clearly couldn't grasp the concept! Here have another: many countries consider an ICU bed... define an ICU bed, as one in which a patient can receive mechanical ventilation. This definition is by no means universal, is by no means standardized as is evidenced by, for example, American ICU beds are often defined by staffing availability.
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Offline eyeball

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Re: Canadian healthcare
« Reply #71 on: October 12, 2021, 11:52:57 am »
you struggle so with common sense: obviously the intent of hospital ERs is to provide trauma and emergency services for people in imminent danger of losing their life or suffering permanent damage to their health.

That might be the intent but common knowledge says you can speed up your passage thru or into the health system by showing up at ER.  My wife is recovering in hospital from surgery right now that likely would have been delayed by the length of time it was taking to get a diagnostic CT scan of her abdomen. After complaining for a couple of months about the pain she was in to the medical clinic she went to the local ER. The attending physician ordered an emergency scan the next day.  Her GP told her privately later that she did the right thing.

I think no matter how one deals with our health system there'll always be a certain element that says its everyone for themselves.

Then there was the time I organized a petition for better food on the ward I was stuck in for a week.
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Offline The Cynic

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Re: Canadian healthcare
« Reply #72 on: October 12, 2021, 03:03:17 pm »
you've got so little game, the waldo is bored with your blustering and inability to present substantive detail to support your madBarking nothingness. Oh wait... my crack research team wants to throw you a bone in response to your claim that, "they seem to all show" - LOL!

What a lovely and completely anonymous "source" you have produced WALL-E! And what does it say? What does it say, WALL-E??? Why... why it says that the NP article was correct and the US has twice as many ICU beds as we do!! How kind of you to post one of your pretty graphics to support my own point!

Mind you,  it's nice to be compared with Zamiba and China and Trinidad and Tobago, sure. Good to know we have more beds than Sri Lanka - assuming any of this is truthful, of course, and remotely up to date. But wouldn't it make more sense to compare us with our OECD brethren, or other western countries only, you brainless Liberal hack?

And by the way, wouldn't the availability of hospital beds have a major impact on how many ICU beds were actually needed? I mean, given we're 33rd place in terms of hospital beds I'd think we'd need MORE ICU beds than most.


https://www.statista.com/statistics/1115999/intensive-care-bed-rates-hospitals-select-countries-worldwide/

https://www.statista.com/statistics/283273/oecd-countries--hospital-bed-density/

Offline The Cynic

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Re: Canadian healthcare
« Reply #73 on: October 12, 2021, 03:15:59 pm »
=> the latest request from provincial premiers asking the federal government for an increase to health transfers was presented this past March, albeit it was initially presented last 2020 fall...

Are you going to try to tell us oh propaganda-minister, that the premiers didn't ask for more health care funding in 2019 and 2018 and 2017 and 2016 and 2015? Really? Seriously?

 
Quote
something about that pandemic thingee acted to constrain the federal government - you know, that $1 billion spent on vaccines, the $25 billion in direct funding to the provinces to, among other things, bolster their health systems, etc..

Short term emergency funding, WALL-E, not for continuing care or hiring more doctors or building more hospitals.
But... you know that. Because you're stupid but you're not dumb, right?

Quote
=> as it stands, the 2021-2022 federal government health transfer to the provinces will amount to ~$43 billion for health care, under an existing agreement that sees the amount rise by at least 3% per year.

That's so generous of your party, WALL-E Why, it's almost as much as the rate of inflation and will slow down the deterioration of the health care system... slightly! I mean, our population is aging and you guys are bringing in a half million people a year to add to the burden. Oh and by the by, given the tremendous level of borrowing by your party inflation is on the rise, which means almost all of any increase will be eaten up by the inflation you're causing! Hey!

Quote
=> waldo historical reference point: in 2011, Harper Conservatives set in place 6% health care transfer increases that would remain in effect until 2016-17, after which it would grow at a minimum of 3%, or a 3-year average of economic growth, whichever is higher. The Trudeau Liberal government has maintained that formula; since 2017-18, the increase has grown by an average of 3.64%.

Which was INADEQUATE even then, WALL-E! And since your party is causing inflation to spike it will be even less so.


Offline The Cynic

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Re: Canadian healthcare
« Reply #74 on: October 12, 2021, 03:20:39 pm »
you struggle so with common sense: obviously the intent of hospital ERs is to provide trauma and emergency services for people in imminent danger of losing their life or suffering permanent damage to their health.

TRUE! The original intent! Unfortunately, with the deteriorating health care system - a health care system which started to deteriorate when your party massively cut health care transfers under Chretien, lots of people have no primary care physicians any more! And given how your party cut back health care transfers to the provinces they don't have money to train and hire more! It's too bad the Liberal party doesn't care more about people's health care, isn't it? But when have those political weasels ever cared about anything but their own jobs?