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91
Canadian Politics / Re: No llores por mí Alberta
« Last post by Gorgeous Graham on October 20, 2020, 07:14:43 pm »
You're living in a dream world if you don't see how prevalent environmental concerns have become to investors. The costs of AGW are becoming astronomical.

I'm not saying some investors don't care about the environment.  I'm saying the market doesn't work like that.  The market attempts to determine the value of each company.  If some investors flee oil companies because of environmental concerns and thus the stock price of these companies drops below what they're actually worth, other investors who only care about money will invest and drive the price up again.

Oil stock prices haven't dropped because of virtuous investors, they've dropped because of changes in the global price of oil and political difficulties getting pipelines built.

Just like most consumers and businesses aren't going to buying EV's as long as they cost twice as much as traditional vehicles.
92
American Politics / Re: The Donald Trump Thread
« Last post by waldo on October 20, 2020, 07:04:45 pm »
moot point! There's a reason for the recent uptick in articles/mentions/speculations on whether or not a sitting president can pardon himself!  ;D

of course there's always the weasel-around where Trump claims he's unable to continue and the "25th amendment" shifts Pence into the Presidency... and pardons flow from there!

by the by:


Here’s what 12 experts say about whether President Trump can pardon himself
93
Canadian Politics / Re: No llores por mí Alberta
« Last post by JMT on October 20, 2020, 06:58:50 pm »
Yes our economy has been quite dependent on oil profits the last 20 years.  We did well through the great recession better than most because of our oil, and so did our dollar.  The past few years the price of oil is in the tank and so is our dollar.  Not a coincidence.

That's pretty revisionist. Ontario was a have not province for many of the oil boom years. Now it's not. Most of the growth in energy came at the expense of Canada's other industries.
94
General Discussion / Re: How about a Discussion on Jordan Peterson?
« Last post by MH on October 20, 2020, 06:58:39 pm »
No it doesn't explain everything, but it might explain why more men go into engineering and more women go into medicine etc.

It might, but a professor should know about things like cause, correlation, and such.  This kind of speculation doesn't help the argument at all.  If there are differences in physiology that could explain inclinations to areas of knowledge, the assessment and analysis must be fathoms deeper than what he offers here.

If you agree with his thesis, even, he's doing it a disservice by presenting it with only surface level evidence.

 
95
Canadian Politics / Re: No llores por mí Alberta
« Last post by JMT on October 20, 2020, 06:55:04 pm »
That's not true.  Our annual GDP has dropped since oil went bust in late 2014/early 2015 and has since not reached the annual GDP levels of any of the really good years we had every year from 2011 through 2014.

https://tradingeconomics.com/canada/gdp

Quarterly growth grew quickly in 2017 because the economy contracted hard in 2015-2016, and markets tend to jump quickly after a bust, but it has yet to recover fully.

Actually, it is true. Those numbers need to be placed in context. We have placed either first or second in growth in the G7 in virtually every year since 2014. Global growth slowed. It wasn't just Canada.

Oh, and you can't properly chart GDP growth in someone else's currency. We didn't have the kind of GDP shrinkage that chart implies.

https://tradingeconomics.com/canada/gdp-constant-prices

The annual growth rate also disagrees with your assessment:

https://tradingeconomics.com/canada/gdp-growth-annual
96
Canadian Politics / Re: Government Day-to-Day
« Last post by waldo on October 20, 2020, 06:52:00 pm »
Which of the toxic cesspool hate bots on Twitter are you Waldo?

member squiggy, my post offered you several aspects to comment on; yet, somehow you could only rise sink to this level. It gives me pause to wonder are

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3FVKo9vwIaY

97
Canadian Politics / Re: No llores por mí Alberta
« Last post by Gorgeous Graham on October 20, 2020, 06:51:09 pm »
And yet, the country overall has done exceptionally well during the low oil price phase that started in 2014. 2017 even saw our highest quarterly growth in 40 years.

That's not true.  Our annual GDP has dropped since oil went bust in late 2014/early 2015 and has since not reached the annual GDP levels of any of the really good years we had every year from 2011 through 2014.

https://tradingeconomics.com/canada/gdp

Quarterly growth grew quickly in 2017 because the economy contracted hard in 2015-2016, and markets tend to jump quickly after a bust, but it has yet to recover fully.

98
Canadian Politics / Re: No llores por mí Alberta
« Last post by wilber on October 20, 2020, 06:38:06 pm »
That's ridiculous wilbur. Most raw materials can be imported into Canada at a much lower cost than Canadians can produce them.

However, I will say that it needs to be said with some qualifications. Nuanced to a level that's above your understanding on social responsibility.

I dare say that China could get a cargo ship full of lettuce here cheaper than Canada can provide us with it, and before it even wilts!

It doesn’t matter, if your currency drops they will cost more than they did before because they are imported. All those imported raw materials will cost more because our money is worth less. How do expensive imports help the Canadian economy if we don’t have domestic sources to replace them? It will cost our farmers even more to produce their goods. Their imported equipment will cost more. Oil is priced in USD so the diesel they use to run their equipment will cost more  and they will be less competitive? The same will go for other industries. Fishers and truckers will pay more for their equipment and fuel and the costs will all be passed on to you. How does any of this help the Canadian economy or the standard of living of Canadians?
99
American Politics / Re: The Donald Trump Thread
« Last post by waldo on October 20, 2020, 06:36:31 pm »
c'mon member Shady - if you're gonna drop these gems, you can't just do a drive-by... here, have another look/go at this post, hey!

NBC: Say, you know who turned out to be right about forest fires?  Donald Trump.https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/decades-mismanagement-led-choked-forests-now-it-s-time-clear-n1243599?cid=sm_npd_nn_tw_ma

Better late than never!

notwithstanding Trump's limited view/understanding of so-called forest management is a narrow focus represented by the many times he's talked about gettin' rakes out to clean-up the forest floor!  ;D

wait member Shady, what's this... the federal government owns 57% of the forest land in the state of California. What's Trump been waiting on, hey!

Quote
“You’ve got to take care of the floors. You know the floors of the forests, it’s very important,” Trump said amid the charred ruins of Paradise — his first stop on the tour.

Trump went on to explain that the president of Finland, whom he met on an overseas trip a week earlier, told him about raking the forest floors. “He called it a forest nation,” Trump said, “and they spent a lot of time on raking and cleaning and doing things, and they don’t have any problem.”

Finnish President Sauli Niinisto later disputed this. He told a local newspaper that he had briefed Trump on Finland’s efforts to surveil and care for its forests, The Associated Press wrote, “but said he can’t recall anything being mentioned on raking.”

Raking for leaves and needles is not a normal feature of Finnish fire prevention, according to Rami Ruuska, a forest-fires expert at the Finnish Interior Ministry. Instead, Finns focus on removing dead trees from the forest floor — where possible.

c'mon member Shady, what about Trump threatening to withhold federal funds to California... until Cali buys more rakes! (ok, ok, I kid, I kid). But really, what about prescribed burns - AND the climate change Trump claims is a hoax perpetrated by China... causing the other apparent drought and bark-beetle infestation hoaxes!
100
American Politics / Re: The Donald Trump Thread
« Last post by waldo on October 20, 2020, 06:32:27 pm »
Mayors in the mining country, who once supported Democrats, say the party no longer advocates for the working class

that letter was signed by 6 mayors... apparently there's a total of 20 mayors (20 towns) within the so-called Minnesota Iron Range area. What happened to the other 14 mayors, hey? Wait, what's this - a counter from the United Steelworkers Union (USW District 11):

Quote
Recently, Vice President Mike Pence visited Duluth, Minnesota for a Trump campaign rally. Pence claimed that President Trump stood for American jobs, workers and miners and has made America great again.

On August 28th a group of six mayors from the Iron Range wrote an endorsement of Trumps reelection. Our union believes those mayors are misguided and don’t fully understand the nature of the economics of the industry or the iron range. Just drive down the main streets of Virginia and Eveleth and count the shutdown businesses. It hardly seems like the “roaring back to life” that these mayors describe.

Unfortunately, nothing could be further from the truth.

Our nation is in the deepest crisis since the Great Depression and 74,257 people in Minnesota have tested positive for COVID-19; 1,814 have died. President Trump refused to acknowledge the threat posed by the coronavirus, mobilize resources or show leadership in the face of the global pandemic.

As a result of the pandemic, almost half of the workers at the Iron Range's mines were laid off. USS Keetac is still idle and its 260 employees on layoff. Yet somehow, the president and Republican- controlled Senate don’t care enough about Keetac workers or the other 16.3 million Americans who are unemployed to extend enhanced unemployment benefits through the end of the year.

The Trump administration did impose tariffs on imported steel. But for many workers, it was too little and too late. Since January 2017, 7,900 workers in the steel industry have lost their jobs due to shutdowns or cutbacks, including the shutdown of blast furnaces at USS Great Lakes Works.

So far this year, steel mills in the United States have operated at an average of 66% of capacity during 2020, steel production is down by 20% and steel prices are at their lowest point since President Trump took office.

President Trump has allied himself and his administration with the wealthy and powerful and against workers and the most vulnerable in our society.

He’s championed tax cuts for corporations and the wealthy, increasing the federal deficit to record levels, but he’s failed to deliver the infrastructure program to rebuild our nation’s crumbling bridges and roads. He has worked to undermine collective bargaining, workplace safety, environmental safeguards, the Affordable Care Act, government ethics, congressional oversight and voting rights.

Contract negotiations in the steel and iron ore industry were difficult in 2018 and are likely to be difficult again in 2022. The companies will seek to divide us and demand cuts and concessions. Our nation and our union need a leader in the White House that supports working people and labor unions.

Vice President Joe Biden has long been a friend of workers and our union. He will fight to raise the minimum wage, expand access to affordable health care, stabilize multiemployer pension plans, defend Medicare and Social Security and preserve and expand civil and labor rights.

The USW is proud to endorse Joe Biden for president, as he seeks to put our country back on a path toward shared prosperity through responsible leadership.

Democrats used to be the party of the middle class.  Now they’re the party of the wealthy and elites.

 ;D geezaz member Shady! Now do Republicans... the party of???
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