Canadian Politics Today

Beyond Politics => General Discussion => Topic started by: Queefer Sutherland on July 09, 2021, 01:38:49 am


Title: Work from home culture
Post by: Queefer Sutherland on July 09, 2021, 01:38:49 am
Get caught masturbating on a Zoom call?

Roll out of bed to check your work email, then immediately roll back into bed for another hour of zzz's?

Complete a big business deal on the can?

Lose a big business deal on the can and throw your hot feces at the bathroom wall in rage?

Develop an inappropriate sexual relationship with Cortana the Windows 10 assistant?

Retired and don't know what i'm talking and spend your days trying to masturbate like you did when you were 17?

Coworker not replying to your emails promptly and you wonder if they're off busy masturbating again?

Learned to type with 1 hand in order to masturbate while working?

Can't stop talking about mazturbation?
Title: Re: Work from home culture
Post by: MH on July 09, 2021, 04:17:09 am
Wow, that post mentioned **** a lot.

Are we going to there now?



Title: Re: Work from home culture
Post by: MH on July 09, 2021, 05:15:56 am
*** = mazturb'n
Title: Re: Work from home culture
Post by: MH on July 09, 2021, 05:17:02 am
It seems to be the cultural impact of the internet on that activity is the most ignored topic in society today.
Title: Re: Work from home culture
Post by: MH on July 09, 2021, 09:09:34 am
When you think of it - isn't this a HUGE blessing ?

The sex version of sugar-free Coke ?
Title: Re: Work from home culture
Post by: wilber on July 09, 2021, 11:52:51 am
Traffic here is back to pre pandemic levels. Who are all these people working from home?
Title: Re: Work from home culture
Post by: MH on July 09, 2021, 12:30:59 pm
Traffic here is back to pre pandemic levels. Who are all these people working from home?

Anyone corporate, any coders...
Title: Re: Work from home culture
Post by: wilber on July 09, 2021, 12:37:29 pm
Anyone corporate, any coders...

Maybe its just me.  I have a niece who is working from home and whenever I phone to renew insurance it is someone working from home. I've got in the habit of asking where they are. So far I have talked to BCAA agents in Langley, Chilliwack and Prince George.
Title: Re: Work from home culture
Post by: BC_cheque on July 09, 2021, 03:16:40 pm
I was reading an article earlier today about TO landlords telling bank CEO's to find their backbone and bring staff back.  At my new job they're insisting on everyone doing 3 days but there's been pushback. 

The genie is out of the bottle and people are switching jobs if they can find remote but if all companies start reinstating the same policies it won't last.

It's gonna be interesting to see how long this goes on.

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/business/article-top-office-landlord-calls-on-big-bank-ceos-to-find-a-backbone-bring/
Title: Re: Work from home culture
Post by: Dia on July 09, 2021, 03:47:11 pm
I'm on leave till next week, but have been checking emails.  Looks like Management is considering implementing a part-time work from home policy; they were in the process of testing it (some people worked from home 1 day every two weeks) prior to Covid so I'm hopeful of maybe a couple days a week working from home.
Title: Re: Work from home culture
Post by: MH on July 09, 2021, 04:07:30 pm
It's hard for them to justify making people come back into the office when everybody they're hiring is in South America and Asia though.
Title: Re: Work from home culture
Post by: Queefer Sutherland on July 09, 2021, 04:10:13 pm
Wow, that post mentioned **** a lot.

Are we going to there now?

U got hot pics?
Title: Re: Work from home culture
Post by: Queefer Sutherland on July 09, 2021, 04:11:34 pm
It seems to be the cultural impact of the internet on that activity is the most ignored topic in society today.

Probably right, it brings people shame.  But I don't want to turn this thread into "**** Culture" lol
Title: Re: Work from home culture
Post by: Queefer Sutherland on July 09, 2021, 04:12:24 pm
Maybe its just me.  I have a niece who is working from home and whenever I phone to renew insurance it is someone working from home. I've got in the habit of asking where they are. So far I have talked to BCAA agents in Langley, Chilliwack and Prince George.

BCAA is just CAA but the BC version?
Title: Re: Work from home culture
Post by: Queefer Sutherland on July 09, 2021, 04:14:17 pm
I was reading an article earlier today about TO landlords telling bank CEO's to find their backbone and bring staff back.  At my new job they're insisting on everyone doing 3 days but there's been pushback. 

The genie is out of the bottle and people are switching jobs if they can find remote but if all companies start reinstating the same policies it won't last.

It's gonna be interesting to see how long this goes on.

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/business/article-top-office-landlord-calls-on-big-bank-ceos-to-find-a-backbone-bring/

LOL ya certain landlords would lose lots of money if facilities, hydro etc is being used and they're paying for it.
Title: Re: Work from home culture
Post by: Queefer Sutherland on July 09, 2021, 04:19:36 pm
If people don't go back to work we're all going to become anti-social hermits.  People are already very isolated in our society as it is even before the pandemic.  We're all going to end up just living on the internet and meeting people in virtual reality, which is a pretty sick society.

Our workplace was really one of the few community spaces we have left for adults.  People often don't converse with neighbours near as much as they used to, people have stopped going to church, people are having less kids which means less community contact through schools and child play-friends on their street or class etc.

Society is becoming very ill socially and psychologically while we advance in technology.  We're already feeling seeing these rising of mental illness, the world has sped up and has turned inward.
Title: Re: Work from home culture
Post by: BC_cheque on July 09, 2021, 05:26:23 pm
Agreed.  I'm getting invited to social events and I readily admit I'm nervous about the idea.  I know I'll eventually get over it but after so long not seeing anyone it's scary, I admit.

Going back to work felt really good and I have been in better spirits.  To me hybrid home/office isn't new, I've been doing this since around 2010 and I love it.  Just the right amount of getting out of the house and interacting, but not the burnout 5 days a week which makes you long for weekends/vacations. 

Title: Re: Work from home culture
Post by: MH on July 10, 2021, 07:04:52 am
Start to know your neighbours...
Title: Re: Work from home culture
Post by: Squidward von Squidderson on July 10, 2021, 11:18:24 am
If people don't go back to work we're all going to become anti-social hermits.  People are already very isolated in our society as it is even before the pandemic.  We're all going to end up just living on the internet and meeting people in virtual reality, which is a pretty sick society.

If that’s the case, then you’re doing life wrong. 

When things were uncertain with COVID, we certainly didn’t see many people.  But for several months, knowing how it’s spread and how to prevent it, I’v seen friends about 3-4 times a week….  Probably more than normal!

Quote
Our workplace was really one of the few community spaces we have left for adults.  People often don't converse with neighbours near as much as they used to, people have stopped going to church, people are having less kids which means less community contact through schools and child play-friends on their street or class etc.

Then people will need to fix that problem.  I limit my social contact with people I have to work with, for the most part.  Like MH says…. Go meet your neighbours. 

Quote
 

Society is becoming very ill socially and psychologically while we advance in technology.  We're already feeling seeing these rising of mental illness, the world has sped up and has turned inward.

Are we seeing increased mentally illness issues?  Or just more awareness?
Title: Re: Work from home culture
Post by: wilber on July 10, 2021, 12:08:15 pm
BCAA is just CAA but the BC version?

Yup
Title: Re: Work from home culture
Post by: Queefer Sutherland on July 10, 2021, 05:33:30 pm
If that’s the case, then you’re doing life wrong. 

When things were uncertain with COVID, we certainly didn’t see many people.  But for several months, knowing how it’s spread and how to prevent it, I’v seen friends about 3-4 times a week….  Probably more than normal!

Then people will need to fix that problem.  I limit my social contact with people I have to work with, for the most part.  Like MH says…. Go meet your neighbours. 

And where will people meet friends if they're working at home all day?

What you're saying is you have to go out of your way and make a special effort.  And yes that's true.  But making an effort is by its nature much harder than the environment simply creating opportunities for people no matter what.  A child is going to make more friends if he goes to school rather than if he is home schooled, that's just the nature of the environment.
Title: Re: Work from home culture
Post by: MH on July 10, 2021, 07:45:02 pm
Join a social media group in your neighbourhood.
Title: Re: Work from home culture
Post by: Queefer Sutherland on July 10, 2021, 09:38:31 pm
Join a social media group in your neighbourhood.

But again, this requires effort.  I'm not saying people can't join social activities or communities, i'm saying if you're working from home all day you're going to be more isolated and interacting with less people than working in an office or whatever.

For people with families and kids it's a different story because at least they have their family.  For younger people or single people it will be harder for them.  I have a friend who is single who works at home all day and then barely leaves the house.  You will say that's their fault, I suppose part of it is for not making the effort, but it still isn't healthy.
Title: Re: Work from home culture
Post by: MH on July 11, 2021, 06:47:01 am
Yes, but if your antisocial is the forest social interaction of work actually helpful? I mean it's so minimal
Title: Re: Work from home culture
Post by: BC_cheque on July 11, 2021, 12:56:51 pm
Yes, but if your antisocial is the forest social interaction of work actually helpful? I mean it's so minimal

I can answer this as someone who considers herself antisocial.  Yes, it helps.  Those few days a week, I have to hold eye contact, make small talk and I go through a range of emotions from frustration to laughter with real people in front of me. 

Interestingly, I often wonder what came first, working from home or the anti-social behaviour.  Sometimes I think it's just age and timing.  When I moved out to the burbs I slowly lost touch with my old friends but never really made friends in the new neighbourhood.

However, I notice that my decline began when I first started working from home.  I was an outgoing person before but after a few years I started noticing that when talking to people IRL I would stumble and get nervous. 

There was probably an inclination in me already because my dad is socially awkward (but my mom is a social butterfly) but I do think working from home makes people who have the tendency become worse. 

You seem like a very social person with the big network of friends so you may not understand, but loneliness is very much a problem in our society and many people smarter than you and me who study this stuff believe that WFH and social media are leading causes of it.
Title: Re: Work from home culture
Post by: MH on July 11, 2021, 02:17:49 pm
I can see why WFH could cause it but not social media.

I'm not sure if I am introverted or extroverted.

I asked Joan and she said probably more of an extrovert.
Title: Re: Work from home culture
Post by: Queefer Sutherland on July 11, 2021, 07:28:30 pm
Yes, but if your antisocial is the forest social interaction of work actually helpful? I mean it's so minimal

Will anti-social people become more or less antisocial when not exposed to interaction with people all day?  The answer is very obvious.

People who are social butterflies will probably adapt, they will be compelled to start talking to neighbours and whatnot because its their nature.  Others not so much.

We should be worried about the types of people who spend all day on internet message boards lol.
Title: Re: Work from home culture
Post by: eyeball on July 12, 2021, 01:30:24 am
I'm reminded of stories about lighthouse keepers driven mad by their isolation. There was something more insidious happening however.

To keep the lighthouse lamp perfectly aligned with the horizon it was floated on a pool of liquid mercury. The heat from the lamp evaporated the mercury exposing the hapless lighthouse keepers to the brain destroying effects of mercury vapors.

I seem to crave isolation and often worked on that above-mentioned horizon alone on my boat - I sorta felt like I was at home.
Title: Re: Work from home culture
Post by: MH on July 12, 2021, 07:12:47 am
Ever seen the movie The lighthouse? Pretty cool
Title: Re: Work from home culture
Post by: MH on December 20, 2021, 10:46:00 am
Looks like we are going to have minimal return to the office.

My boss let it drop that our employer has terminated their lease with our building... which is hilarious because we have lockers in there with personal effects.  There has been no official announcement.

In related news, we actually got together for lunch Friday which was wonderful.  And one of the team let it drop that he moved to Windsor !!!  I guess he'll be working from home then...
Title: Re: Work from home culture
Post by: BC_cheque on December 20, 2021, 02:56:16 pm
And one of the team let it drop that he moved to Windsor !!!  I guess he'll be working from home then...

This is one good thing that will come out of the pandemic, a lot of people can move out of the cities.

I'm already planning my exodus though I have to wait for the little one to be a bit older.  Vancouver has been a dumpster fire for a while now.
Title: Re: Work from home culture
Post by: Black Dog on December 20, 2021, 03:03:29 pm
This is one good thing that will come out of the pandemic, a lot of people can move out of the cities.

I'm already planning my exodus though I have to wait for the little one to be a bit older.  Vancouver has been a dumpster fire for a while now.

Why is that a good thing?
Title: Re: Work from home culture
Post by: BC_cheque on December 20, 2021, 03:21:57 pm
Why is that a good thing?

Because over 80% of Canadians live in urban areas.  The density leads to real estate and infrastructure constraints.  It'll be nice to spread the population around a bit.

Title: Re: Work from home culture
Post by: Black Dog on December 20, 2021, 04:23:15 pm
Because over 80% of Canadians live in urban areas.  The density leads to real estate and infrastructure constraints.  It'll be nice to spread the population around a bit.

Density is good. The problem is the lack of housing supply in said urban areas and retrograde housing and planning policies that artificially inflate values

"Spreading the population around" just means you drive up costs in previously affordable areas, continuing the cycle while promoting urban sprawl.
Title: Re: Work from home culture
Post by: MH on December 20, 2021, 04:36:16 pm
The housing supply can never be enough to cover speculation and money laundering
Title: Re: Work from home culture
Post by: BC_cheque on December 20, 2021, 05:38:15 pm
Density is good. The problem is the lack of housing supply in said urban areas and retrograde housing and planning policies that artificially inflate values

"Spreading the population around" just means you drive up costs in previously affordable areas, continuing the cycle while promoting urban sprawl.

Ideally, there is a way to lower prices, but having witnessed the last 20 years I think all levels of government are happy allowing prices to inflate.

With the consideration that the status quo will continue to drive prices out of reach, I think it's good that people have the option to at least move to smaller cities and get into the market. When that happens, more business will be driven to those areas and wages will go up as industry takes hold.  But at least everything isn't saturated in one place. 
Title: Re: Work from home culture
Post by: Dia on December 20, 2021, 06:35:48 pm
I was looking forward to moving to Salmon Arm, where my kids are.
 Been looking around for about 3 years now but lately the prices have gone up enough that I don't think I'll be able to afford it.  The exodus to smaller towns is driving up prices. If I can't move closer to my kids there's not much point in moving at all, so may end up staying in Surrey, because I have a relatively small mortgage.
Title: Re: Work from home culture
Post by: BC_cheque on December 20, 2021, 11:23:06 pm
Condos in Surrey have gone up too these last few years, housing everywhere has. Your money for that condo will still go a lot further in Salmon Arm than Surrey. You can increase your square footage, or stay similar and lower the mortgage amount. Or are you saying a condo in SA is the same price as a condo in Surrey?? 
Title: Re: Work from home culture
Post by: Dia on December 21, 2021, 07:47:54 am
Condos in Surrey have gone up too these last few years, housing everywhere has. Your money for that condo will still go a lot further in Salmon Arm than Surrey. You can increase your square footage, or stay similar and lower the mortgage amount. Or are you saying a condo in SA is the same price as a condo in Surrey??

I'd need a mortgage for the difference between my equity here and the price of whatever I buy in SA.   My income now would cover it, but my retirement income will not.  A few years ago, it would have. 
Title: Re: Work from home culture
Post by: Squidward von Squidderson on December 21, 2021, 12:23:29 pm
I'd need a mortgage for the difference between my equity here and the price of whatever I buy in SA.   My income now would cover it, but my retirement income will not.  A few years ago, it would have.

Im sure you’ve looked, but the outlying communities might be cheaper.  Sicamous, Canoe, Chase…
Title: Re: Work from home culture
Post by: Black Dog on December 21, 2021, 01:31:16 pm
I'm sure I've said this before but as someone who left an unaffordable major city for a cheap small city I can say with absolute certainty that it sucks ass. Sure things are more affordable, but wages are lower and there's sweet f**k all to do in these places.
Title: Re: Work from home culture
Post by: BC_cheque on December 21, 2021, 02:13:09 pm
I'd need a mortgage for the difference between my equity here and the price of whatever I buy in SA.   My income now would cover it, but my retirement income will not.  A few years ago, it would have.

But that'll change when the WFH crowd gets there!  ;)
Title: Re: Work from home culture
Post by: BC_cheque on December 21, 2021, 02:17:21 pm
I'd need a mortgage for the difference between my equity here and the price of whatever I buy in SA.   My income now would cover it, but my retirement income will not.  A few years ago, it would have.

I'm not trying to be antagonizing but this still doesn't make sense to me. If you are not increasing your square footage, I am pretty confident that a similar condo in SA is cheaper than a condo in Surrey. If your retirement income is enough for your Surrey condo, how is not enough for a cheaper one in SA?

Were you planning on upsizing and that dream is gone? Or are you now stuck working longer and need to be in the city? If so, that's still the bigger issue of housing being unaffordable everywhere.

You can't retire as early as you wanted, but by the same token, a first time buyer is now priced out of Surrey whereas they still have a chance in SA if they can WFH.
Title: Re: Work from home culture
Post by: Dia on December 21, 2021, 02:52:12 pm
I'm not trying to be antagonizing but this still doesn't make sense to me. If you are not increasing your square footage, I am pretty confident that a similar condo in SA is cheaper than a condo in Surrey. If your retirement income is enough for your Surrey condo, how is not enough for a cheaper one in SA?

Were you planning on upsizing and that dream is gone? Or are you now stuck working longer and need to be in the city? If so, that's still the bigger issue of housing being unaffordable everywhere.

You can't retire as early as you wanted, but by the same token, a first time buyer is now priced out of Surrey whereas they still have a chance in SA if they can WFH.

My retirement income wouldn't afford this place, if I had to get a mortgage on it at the price it was when I bought it, which was under $200,000.  As long as the bank simply renews my mortgage here, then they'd never look at my income or do a stress test, which I'd fail after retirement.  I might qualify for a very small mortgage after retirement, but unless SA prices stay fairly flat and my place continues to increase in value, it and my equity are unlikely to be enough.  A mobile home is my best option, at this point, but also has some drawbacks - like pad rent and being homeless if it's bought out by developers, which is what's happened to three parks along King George in the last few years. 

I've looked at smaller places but being near a hospital/ medical facilities is also a factor, cause partner.  If it was just me, I'd have more options.  I like Enderby, close and less expensive, but what I've seen so far needs TLC, at least. 

I'm sure I'll figure something out, just have to keep working at it.  Planning to talk to a mortgage broker again in the Spring and a realtor when we visit next year.   Might have to get a mortgage with my son, an option the partner dislikes. 


Title: Re: Work from home culture
Post by: Dia on December 21, 2021, 02:59:24 pm
I'm sure I've said this before but as someone who left an unaffordable major city for a cheap small city I can say with absolute certainty that it sucks ass. Sure things are more affordable, but wages are lower and there's sweet f**k all to do in these places.

I'm kind of a homebody, anyway, so that's not a huge concern for me.  When I was younger, I wanted the city life for all that I could do, not so interested any more.  But I grew up in the Cariboo, so I know what you mean about SFA to do.  Just crappy bars, and lots of them. 
Title: Re: Work from home culture
Post by: Squidward von Squidderson on December 21, 2021, 03:44:16 pm
I'm sure I've said this before but as someone who left an unaffordable major city for a cheap small city I can say with absolute certainty that it sucks ass. Sure things are more affordable, but wages are lower and there's sweet f**k all to do in these places.

What would you consider the downsized city?  (As an example…. Don’t need to know where you live).

Depends entirely on the person.  I would never live in a major city.  Maybe Calgary…. If that’s considered major.  Victoria maybe…. But that’s not ‘major’,is it?    Cities are soul-sucking and unfriendly to me. 

Give me some green-space close by (where I don’t have to see anyone) and close to outdoor activities. I can visit Vancouver anytime if I need to go to the theatre, or concert or whatever. 

ETA:

Plus, I would need room for a kayak, a boat/trailer and a couple outboards.  Sooo….  My lifestyle is not conducive to living in a city, unless I could afford a house with a big yard.  But I definitely cannot.
Title: Re: Work from home culture
Post by: Squidward von Squidderson on December 21, 2021, 04:04:21 pm
My retirement income wouldn't afford this place, if I had to get a mortgage on it at the price it was when I bought it, which was under $200,000.  As long as the bank simply renews my mortgage here, then they'd never look at my income or do a stress test, which I'd fail after retirement.  I might qualify for a very small mortgage after retirement, but unless SA prices stay fairly flat and my place continues to increase in value, it and my equity are unlikely to be enough.  A mobile home is my best option, at this point, but also has some drawbacks - like pad rent and being homeless if it's bought out by developers, which is what's happened to three parks along King George in the last few years. 

I've looked at smaller places but being near a hospital/ medical facilities is also a factor, cause partner.  If it was just me, I'd have more options.  I like Enderby, close and less expensive, but what I've seen so far needs TLC, at least. 

I'm sure I'll figure something out, just have to keep working at it.  Planning to talk to a mortgage broker again in the Spring and a realtor when we visit next year.   Might have to get a mortgage with my son, an option the partner dislikes.

Needing to be close to medical facilities certainly limits your options.    I see a condo in a 55+ building for $259k right in Salmon Arm.

Or, better yet, get your kids to move into a big house with a suite and live in the suite!  Win-win!  :) 
Title: Re: Work from home culture
Post by: Dia on December 21, 2021, 06:21:11 pm
Needing to be close to medical facilities certainly limits your options.    I see a condo in a 55+ building for $259k right in Salmon Arm.

Or, better yet, get your kids to move into a big house with a suite and live in the suite!  Win-win!  :)

If that's one of the ones I saw, it's "no dogs" or "small dog only" or 800 SF, too small.

Kids + suite would be good, and that's something we'll talk about with broker and realtor.
Title: Re: Work from home culture
Post by: Black Dog on December 22, 2021, 11:56:16 am
What would you consider the downsized city?  (As an example…. Don’t need to know where you live).

My current city is just a hair over 100K people. I think you need a critical mass of around 200K people for a city to feel vibrant. I also think a lot of these places need someone with a time machine to go back and put a bullet in the head of anyone who proposes building a shopping mall or "power center".

Quote
Depends entirely on the person.  I would never live in a major city.  Maybe Calgary…. If that’s considered major.  Victoria maybe…. But that’s not ‘major’,is it?    Cities are soul-sucking and unfriendly to me.

Give me some green-space close by (where I don’t have to see anyone) and close to outdoor activities. I can visit Vancouver anytime if I need to go to the theatre, or concert or whatever.

Are you sure it's the cities that are unfriendly or is it that you just don't like people?

Title: Re: Work from home culture
Post by: eyeball on December 22, 2021, 01:37:46 pm
My regional district and local municipalities on the west coast of the island are just as stricken with the the issues of availability and affordability for housing.  Housing has always been tight for the 46 years I've lived here and still is.  Tofino led the pack with its affordability issues but prices everywhere in the region have skyrocketed.  Despite the apparent abundance of unoccupied land in the form of tree farms and parks the old adage; land, they ain't making it anymore, couldn't be truer around here.  Notwithstanding that at least one 1st nation here has developed and built housing and single-handedly been responsible for increasing housing stock by some 60% in the region. Some houses have been rented and others let on long term 100 year leases.

Everyone else is looking at increasing density within the limits of their respective jurisdictions. This has increased the ire of nimby's especially in the municipalities. In the regional district density changes will result in rules that allow two residences on as little as one acre instead of 2.5 acres, subject as always to the capacity of a property to deal with sewage and provide potable water.  Nimbyism isn't as nearly as pronounced as it is in the towns.  There was more of that in the past when cottage residential zoning was brought in that allowed for a residence and up to 4 rental cabins. The collapse of logging and fishing as mainstays in the economy 20 odd years ago however put pressure on planners to allow the zoning so people could have an income and a lot of the nimbyism seemed to fade away.  In contradiction to appearances the explosion of tourism and advent of things like Airbnb seem to have whittled nimbyism down somewhat, not everywhere but it certainly has in my neighbourhood. STR's remain a hot topic in the towns.

There has been a noticeable increase in the number of city folk selling their places for big bucks and buying a place here with a cottage or bnb they could run.  Proposed zoning changes seem to have increased interest in this but prices are going up so fast - not having the ability to generate an income is often the deal breaker especially for younger people trying to get in while or where they can.  I see a bit of a zoning compliance shock coming up given how few applications for STR permits have surfaced.  I know full well there are way more STR's operating in lieu of a permit at the moment but that said, virtually all the long-term rentals are just as illegal in the sense they're unregulated and without a permit as well.  A lot of what people do around here has always hinged on someone not complaining but with that on the increase too...stay tuned I guess.  Old timers around here get a kick out of the newly landed city-slickers who've become nimby's. Fortunately they seem to mostly pick on one another.

It appears resistance to increasing density is probably the number one factor causing housing issues in Canada's big cities.

https://www.bnnbloomberg.ca/angry-neighbours-block-housing-that-canada-s-cities-badly-need-1.1698918
Title: Re: Work from home culture
Post by: Squidward von Squidderson on December 22, 2021, 03:55:36 pm
My current city is just a hair over 100K people. I think you need a critical mass of around 200K people for a city to feel vibrant. I also think a lot of these places need someone with a time machine to go back and put a bullet in the head of anyone who proposes building a shopping mall or "power center".

I’ll go visit cities when I need larger cultural events.  I certainly am not going to live in one.  My lifestyle (I like to go places) doesn’t suit it.

Quote
Are you sure it's the cities that are unfriendly or is it that you just don't like people?

Very sure it’s the city.  I say hi and am friendly to everyone I see!  But I certainly don’t want to stand shoulder-to-shoulder with them on a daily basis.  Whenever I have gone to do outdoor activities anywhere near cities, they have been strewn with garbage…. Why?  Cuz city people visit them.

Title: Re: Work from home culture
Post by: Black Dog on December 23, 2021, 10:35:03 am
I’ll go visit cities when I need larger cultural events.  I certainly am not going to live in one.  My lifestyle (I like to go places) doesn’t suit it.

Very sure it’s the city.  I say hi and am friendly to everyone I see!  But I certainly don’t want to stand shoulder-to-shoulder with them on a daily basis. 

Some cities are unfriendly; Vancouver is a very cold city. Toronto surprised me with how welcoming people were. Depends.

I live in a town/city chock a block full of people with Browning rifle and **** Trudeau stickers festooned on their massive, jacked up pick up trucks; that makes me feel more unwelcome than getting a cold shoulder from a stranger on the street.

Quote
Whenever I have gone to do outdoor activities anywhere near cities, they have been strewn with garbage…. Why?  Cuz city people visit them.

Fixed that for ya.