Author Topic: Sports Culture  (Read 819 times)

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Offline wilber

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Re: Sports Culture
« Reply #30 on: July 29, 2020, 01:52:52 pm »
So there’s controverses over the name Totems?

Not that I know of but with all the controversy and name changing going on with pro teams, why risk it?



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Offline MH

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Re: Sports Culture
« Reply #31 on: July 29, 2020, 02:19:44 pm »
Not that I know of but with all the controversy and name changing going on with pro teams, why risk it?

The Toronto "NO COMMENTS"  :D

Offline the_squid

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Re: Sports Culture
« Reply #32 on: July 29, 2020, 03:18:27 pm »
Not that I know of but with all the controversy and name changing going on with pro teams, why risk it?

Because that name doesn’t seem to be exploitative, racist or about negative stereotypes like “redskins” or “Eskimos”.

Offline wilber

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Re: Sports Culture
« Reply #33 on: July 29, 2020, 05:14:43 pm »
Because that name doesn’t seem to be exploitative, racist or about negative stereotypes like “redskins” or “Eskimos”.

Maybe but on the other hand you could hear indigenous groups saying we don’t call them totems, that’s a European word.
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Offline the_squid

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Re: Sports Culture
« Reply #34 on: July 29, 2020, 09:53:08 pm »
Maybe but on the other hand you could hear indigenous groups saying we don’t call them totems, that’s a European word.

Well....  i don’t think so, as it’s English.  Of course they didn’t use English.

Offline kimmy

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Re: Sports Culture
« Reply #35 on: July 30, 2020, 11:51:54 pm »
Because that name doesn’t seem to be exploitative, racist or about negative stereotypes like “redskins” or “Eskimos”.

Cultural appropriation.  "My culture is not your hockey jersey!"

 -k
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Offline kimmy

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Re: Sports Culture
« Reply #36 on: July 31, 2020, 12:03:22 am »
On a vaguely related note, Ethan Bear's culture IS on his hockey jersey!  During Tuesday's exhibition game, Ethan wore this special jersey, with his nameplate in Cree:




Quote
An Indigenous NHL player paid special homage to his nation on his jersey during Tuesday night's Battle of Alberta between the Edmonton Oilers and Calgary Flames.

During the exhibition game, Oilers defenceman Ethan Bear wore a jersey with his name written in Cree syllabics. The 23-year-old is from the Ochapowace Nation in southern Saskatchewan.

In a statement posted on the NHL website, Bear said he was wearing the jersey for all Indigenous players who came before him and for Indigenous kids dreaming of playing in the NHL.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/ethan-bear-edmonton-oilers-cree-name-syllabics-1.5667325

Bear's family worked with Pro-Am Sports on the jersey to make sure they got the lettering right.

There's also a Kailer Yamamoto jersey with Japanese script, but I don't know if he has any plans to wear it.



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Offline the_squid

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Re: Sports Culture
« Reply #37 on: July 31, 2020, 12:52:02 pm »
NHL playoffs start tomorrow.  Hockey all day, every day!  Exciting!

Offline wilber

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Re: Sports Culture
« Reply #38 on: July 31, 2020, 01:07:10 pm »
Cultural appropriation.  "My culture is not your hockey jersey!"

 -k
Yup,  yet a Mongolian can don a kilt and play the bagpipes badly but it isn't cultural appropriation. Not that I would know when they are being played badly.
"Never trust a man without a single redeeming vice" WSC

Offline the_squid

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Re: Sports Culture
« Reply #39 on: July 31, 2020, 06:32:32 pm »
Cultural appropriation.  "My culture is not your hockey jersey!"

 -k

Where has that argument been used? 
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Offline MH

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Re: Sports Culture
« Reply #40 on: May 01, 2021, 06:15:32 am »
@eyeball

Everyone wins and gets a trophy!

I mean I grew up playing in hockey and baseball leagues where teams would routinely be crushed 30 to 0 and I didn't really get it at first either but 20 odd years on now it doesn't seem to have hurt my kids. If anything sometimes late at night the ghosts of losers I helped crush come back to haunt me. I just hope none of them went postal and took it out on some other hapless souls.

My sports failures were just epic.  And I wanted so much to succeed.  It was only when I finally gave it up that I started to grow as an adolescent.  My poor loving father, a generous and positive person to a fault, was a jock of all trades.  A star in football, hockey, and baseball.  I made sports the centre of my personality and I was the worst... it was crushing.
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Offline kimmy

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Re: Sports Culture
« Reply #41 on: May 01, 2021, 12:27:00 pm »
This year's edition of the Oilers has Darnell Nurse (black Canadian), Ethan Bear (aboriginal Canadian), Kailer Yamamoto (American with Japanese ancestry), and Jujhar Khaira (Canadian with Punjabi ancestry) playing every night.  Not just as randos who get called up for one or two games from the minors, but as major contributors, especially Nurse.  Hockey is seen as a very white sport, but there have been an increasing number of black players in recent years. There have been a modest number of aboriginal players over the years, but they are pretty rare. Players of Asian ancestry have also been pretty rare, and aside from Manny Malhotra,  Khaira is the only player of Indian background that I can think of.

Hockey is an expensive sport to get your kids into. The cost of the equipment alone is a big barrier to entry that probably disproportionately affects aboriginal Canadians.  But that doesn't explain the rarity of players of Asian background in the NHL.  Canada has large and financially successful Asian communities... if it was just a matter of demographic data one would expect to see more Canadians of Asian background go to the NHL.   I wonder how much of it is cultural.  There's a stereotype about Asian parents being demanding and focused on academic achievement-- and feel that having their children waste so much time playing sports will hurt their grades. There are probably also many parents who arrived in Canada as immigrants from poor backgrounds who feel that spending a bunch of money to get their kids into an expensive sport is wasteful.  But I think also that some of it is to do with a lack of role models.  I think that probably many black kids saw Jarome Iginla winning trophies and gold medals playing hockey and thought "I could do that too." Perhaps if Jarome Iginla wins the Rocket Richard Trophy and you go down to the local rink, the other kids won't tell you "black people can't play hockey" anymore.

  I remember when I was young and my Asian friends were interested in Paul Kariya.  They weren't interested in hockey in general, but Paul Kariya was exciting for them.  It was exciting for them to see somebody who looked like them succeeding in something that seemed like it's just for white people.  Perhaps Ethan Bear or Kailer Yamamoto or Jujhar Khaira will make some kid think "hey, I could do that too."

 -k
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Offline wilber

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Re: Sports Culture
« Reply #42 on: May 01, 2021, 08:45:36 pm »
George Armstrong who was captain of the Cup winning Leafs during the sixties had an Ojibway mother. Info only not trying to make a point.



His nickname was The Chief.

He died in January, age 90.
« Last Edit: May 01, 2021, 08:53:10 pm by wilber »
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Offline waldo

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Re: Sports Culture
« Reply #43 on: May 02, 2021, 01:15:25 am »
Hockey is seen as a very white sport, but there have been an increasing number of black players in recent years.

member kimmy, your 2 referenced examples of 'black' players, Nurse & Iginla... are mixed race. Wait now... 2 of your other examples are also mixed race - Yamamoto & Kariya. Since you're emphasizing the Oilers, have you no luv for 'black' Caleb Jones... oh wait now waldo... he's also mixed race!

jeezaz waldo, there seems to be a whole lotta white hockey culture misappropriation going on here! Member kimmy might want a do-over here - just sayin.

just in case there's any inadvertent impressions about diversity making inroads in the NHL (players or fan base), let factual waldo reference an Oct, 2020 analysis by FiveThirtyEight:

       

/s ... see the tag... see it?
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Offline MH

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Re: Sports Culture
« Reply #44 on: May 11, 2021, 05:51:15 pm »
Who wants to come over for Beer, Nachos and .... Bo-Taoshi

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y2OfCkCJg2E