Author Topic: Misconceptions  (Read 52 times)

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Offline MH

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Misconceptions
« on: October 18, 2017, 07:01:41 am »

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Offline MH

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Re: Misconceptions
« Reply #1 on: September 27, 2021, 09:51:31 am »
Sorry THIS Is worth a revisit

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_common_misconceptions#Film_and_television

Quote
Economics

Total population living in extreme poverty, by world region 1987 to 2015[339]
The total number of people living in extreme absolute poverty globally, by the widely used metric of $1.00/day (in 1990 U.S. dollars) has decreased over the last several decades, but most people surveyed in several countries incorrectly think it has increased or stayed the same.[340]
Monopolists do not try to sell items for the highest possible price, nor do they try to maximize profit per unit, but rather they try to maximize total profit.[341]
For any given production set, there is not a set amount of labor input (a "lump of labor") to produce that output. This fallacy is commonly seen in Luddite and later, related movements as an argument either that automation causes permanent, structural unemployment, or that labor-limiting regulation can decrease unemployment. But, in fact, changes in capital allocation, efficiency, and economies of learning can change the amount of labor input for a given set of production.[342]
Income is not a direct factor in determining credit score in the United States. Rather, credit score is impacted by the amount of unused available credit, which is in turn affected by income.[343] Income is also considered when evaluating creditworthiness more generally.
The US public vastly overestimates the amount spent on foreign aid.[344]
An increase in gross income will never reduce one's post-tax earnings (net income) due to putting one in a higher tax bracket. In every country with tax brackets, they only indicate the marginal tax rate, as opposed to the total income tax rate; only the additional income earned in the higher tax bracket is taxed at the elevated rate.[345] An increase in gross income can reduce one's net income in a welfare cliff, however, when benefits are suddenly withdrawn when passing a certain income threshold.[346]