Author Topic: Dog culture  (Read 130 times)

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Online Bubbermiley

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Dog culture
« on: April 08, 2022, 04:16:26 pm »
Out with the old and in with the new. Got another Northern rescue---a shepherd lab husky cross, which are ubiquitous on Manitoba reserves. He's the third one I've had. The first was a sled dog that had been around the block and lived free for a while; the second underwent a horrible trauma as a pup as a result of a culling of the litter and never really trusted humans again. This one was born after his mother was rescued so he's just a happy puppy with a genetic need to scavenge everywhere.
Puppies are nearly as much work as children.

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Offline Squidward von Squidderson

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Re: Dog culture
« Reply #1 on: April 08, 2022, 04:26:53 pm »
My friend got a collie/Aussie shepherd cross a few months ago.  Incredibly intelligent dog, but is pretty high maintenance.  This one is a bit stubborn and, while it knows how it should behave, takes advantage of her owner’s weaknesses!  He is going to need to put in a lot of time in the coming months to get it to where he needs it to be.
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Online Bubbermiley

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Re: Dog culture
« Reply #2 on: April 08, 2022, 07:26:21 pm »
This guy is very food motivated so he's been easy to train. We have sit, lie down, come, no bites, no barking, and drop it and he's only 19 weeks old. He figured out outside potty as soon as the weather switched from -30 all the time. There will be so many new things to try to eat though once the snow finally melts.
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Offline eyeball

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Re: Dog culture
« Reply #3 on: April 09, 2022, 12:12:42 am »
I'm in cat mode at the moment but I've had a few dogs over the years.  I'm down to one aging cat and have been thinking about a dog again.  I don't know if I'm into dealing with as rambunctious a bundle of energy as most puppies but I've given some thought to taking in an older dog who needs a new home and who also likes hanging out beside the wood-stove and taking it easy.  All but one of the dogs I've had were ones that I adopted as adults, they were all into going out on boats or out in the bush...back of the pick-up sort of mongrels.  One of them just couldn't be told to stay home.  If we took the boat he'd run to town if we took the truck he'd swim over.  He trained us well.
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Offline Dia

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Re: Dog culture
« Reply #4 on: April 09, 2022, 11:24:41 am »
We've got an Arab Village dog, called a Baladi (means local in Arabic).  He's very fast, and very smart.  He once watched me try to teach our other dog how to fetch, and figured it out faster than she did.  He learned to sit on his hind end with front paws up after I praised him for that once.  However, whether he'll do any particular trick entirely depends on his mood.  He's not the type of dog I'd ever trust off-leash as he's far too independent minded.  He's more like a partner than a pet and is a two-person dog, allowing only myself and my partner to touch him for the last 11.5 years.   

Our other dog, a shepherd/rottie cross, passed last year.  She was very sweet, very eager to please at all times - and thought the sun rose and set out of my partner's butt.  :)  She wasn't so easy to train, as she'd get so excited she'd forget what we were supposed to be doing.  Despite her devotion to my partner, she wasn't particularly affectionate - she liked pets, but never really asked for them, but would always try to be in the same room as her favorite human.

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Offline wilber

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Re: Dog culture
« Reply #5 on: April 09, 2022, 08:00:53 pm »
We had a Lab in our home for more than 35 years. I'm fine with small dogs but they aren't my thing. Same goes for cats. My present townhouse and age are no longer conducive to accomidating a high energy dog like a young Lab. They don't start growing up until they hit around 5. My daughter is a Lab lover as well and her latest is just over two. It's a wonderful dog, full of fun but either going flat out or asleep. The only in between is eating because if Labs have a downside, they are walking stomachs.
"Never trust a man without a single redeeming vice" WSC

Online Bubbermiley

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Re: Dog culture
« Reply #6 on: April 09, 2022, 08:09:59 pm »
My first lab cross, the former sled dog, could literally run for hours and literally had to for at least an hour a day. I would take him on my bike and he could keep up and even go faster if he wanted.
My second one liked to lie around and sleep, and go for one 15 minute walk a day.
This one has lots of energy but is still apprehensive about outside and turns around to go home before we really get started. But that will likely change.