Author Topic: Atlas flight 3591 crash  (Read 364 times)

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Offline Omni

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Re: Atlas flight 3591 crash
« Reply #90 on: May 03, 2019, 11:45:11 pm »
I can imagine Boeing is not real happy to have their name in the headlines again with another 737 accident, this time running off the runway and into the St. John river on landing in JAX Florida. This was not a Max 8 (since they are all grounded) and I suspect a combination of bad weather and perhaps pilot error. Thankfully all pax. are OK other than maybe some minor injuries. 

Offline Omni

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Re: Atlas flight 3591 crash
« Reply #91 on: May 17, 2019, 04:00:23 pm »
Boeing says it has fixed the software problem on the 737 Max 8. Would you get on one now?

Boeing said Thursday it has finished the development of a software fix to its troubled 737 Max.
The plane maker said in a statement it has flown the aircraft with the updated software on 207 flights for more than 360 hours.

https://www.cnn.com/2019/05/16/politics/737-max-boeing-software-fix/index.html

Offline ?Impact

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Re: Atlas flight 3591 crash
« Reply #92 on: May 17, 2019, 04:09:57 pm »
Boeing says it has fixed the software problem on the 737 Max 8. Would you get on one now?

Not the first aircraft with a problem that has been [hopefully] corrected. Public confidence has been badly shaken, so it will take a long time to rebuild it. I would like to see better information on what the software fix was. I would say I have far less confidence in the FAA in reviewing it than in Boeing creating the fix.

Offline Omni

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Re: Atlas flight 3591 crash
« Reply #93 on: May 17, 2019, 04:30:07 pm »
Not the first aircraft with a problem that has been [hopefully] corrected. Public confidence has been badly shaken, so it will take a long time to rebuild it. I would like to see better information on what the software fix was. I would say I have far less confidence in the FAA in reviewing it than in Boeing creating the fix.

I think Boeing's big PR hurdle to get past is that they stuck this MCAS system in the Max 8 and then didn't spend the resources to educate the crews on the system worked even though there are stories from pilots who claimed to have had similar control problems with it even before the two fatal crashes. That suggests an intentional cover up along with the technical problems. A bad combination.