Author Topic: Violence on the east coast  (Read 234 times)

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Online the_squid

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Re: Violence on the east coast
« Reply #45 on: October 19, 2020, 05:00:00 pm »
Allowing resale of licenses seems to be a real problem with managed systems, we see the same thing with supply management quotas. The licenses and quota become commodities in themselves, sometimes worth more than the commodity or service they are intended to control.

Thatís true...   but there are upsides as well.   Fisherman can use their licence as collateral for loans to get better boats and equipment, which makes the industry safer in general and they can get financing for other licences, to earn more money, etc, etc. 

However, the govít still sees fishing licences as a privilege.   Unfortunately, they kept creating more and more licences on the east coast over the decades.  Yes, that spreads the wealth, but it also can spread it too thin. 

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Offline Gorgeous Graham

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Re: Violence on the east coast
« Reply #46 on: October 19, 2020, 05:17:08 pm »
Did you read the BBC article I posted?

Yes.  Throughout much of the article its discussing issues around sustainability and controversies around off-season fishing.  See below.  And it comes down to the size of the lobster population on a yearly basis because people want to make money.  Commercial guys say the off-season catches hurt the lobsters and their living, others say the offseason indigenous catches don't really make much effect.  They have complex problems that need to be dealt with without burning stuff down.

Quote
Derek Thomas, a commercial fisherman for over 25 years, condemns the violence. But he says the government needs to step in and enforce off-season rules for the sake of the lobster population.

"I don't think anybody likes the violence, and I don't think anybody denies their rights. But enough is enough already," he told the BBC.

"Regulations are designed to prevent over-harvesting and to maintain a sustainable fishery, it is all we want for our communities."
...
Mr Thomas says fishermen have "frustration boiling over" after years of deteriorating stocks. Between 2016-2018, lobster caches declined about 10% in the province, although there's no clear indication of why. The pandemic has also cut into lobster exports to the lucrative Chinese market.

This is not the first time indigenous fishermen have clashed with non-indigenous commercial fishers. Shortly after the R v Marshall decision, many indigenous fishermen took to the water in the off-season and fights broke out along wharfs in Quebec, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia.

Like now, the non-indigenous fishermen said they were concerned about the effect that off-season fishing would have on the lobster population.

I can tell how good of a person you are by how you treat the people you disagree with.

Offline Gorgeous Graham

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Re: Violence on the east coast
« Reply #47 on: October 19, 2020, 05:18:30 pm »
I don't understand why I got a 'dumb' for my post, squid ?

Ignore it.  It's called trolling.
I can tell how good of a person you are by how you treat the people you disagree with.

Online wilber

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Re: Violence on the east coast
« Reply #48 on: October 19, 2020, 05:23:20 pm »
Thatís true...   but there are upsides as well.   Fisherman can use their licence as collateral for loans to get better boats and equipment, which makes the industry safer in general and they can get financing for other licences, to earn more money, etc, etc. 

However, the govít still sees fishing licences as a privilege.   Unfortunately, they kept creating more and more licences on the east coast over the decades.  Yes, that spreads the wealth, but it also can spread it too thin.

Yes but the only reason they can use it as collateral is because of its inflated value. It's OK if you got it cheap but if you are trying to get into an industry or expand, it makes it way too expensive for normal mortals. If you are a fisher or farmer who has millions in debt for quota or a license, that is a huge drag on your ability to compete or make a living.
"Never trust a man without a single redeeming vice" WSC
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Offline Montgomery

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Re: Violence on the east coast
« Reply #49 on: October 20, 2020, 12:33:50 pm »
In B.C. the fed fisheries fear the aboriginals and I suspect it would be the same in any other province with any particular natural resource. They don't consider it their job to protect natural resources or the environment. And also fwiw, in B.C. the fed fisheries officers are toothless when it comes to pursuing fines or jail time in most cases.

We will need to deal with this problem some day if it doesn't just naturally go away with time, as they are hoping it will.
It was believed afterward that the man was a lunatic, because there was no sense in what he said. ~M.T.
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