Author Topic: The Queen  (Read 1850 times)

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Offline queenmandy85

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The Queen
« on: September 08, 2022, 01:10:21 pm »
The Queen is dead. God save the King.
Queen Elizabeth was the second longest reigning Queen of Canada. I am old enough to remember the day the old King, George VI died and watching the film of the Coronation of the Queen.
« Last Edit: September 10, 2022, 11:35:29 am by queenmandy85 »
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Offline Black Dog

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Re: The Queen
« Reply #1 on: September 08, 2022, 01:34:34 pm »
The Queen is dead. God save the King.
Queen Elizabeth was the second longest reigning Queen of Canada. I am old enough to remember the day the old King, George IV died and watching the film of the Coronation of the Queen.

Fun fact: George V's doctor euthanized him with a shot of morphine and co-caine so his death would make it into The Times instead of the evening papers.
« Last Edit: September 08, 2022, 02:17:11 pm by Black Dog »

Offline waldo

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Re: The Queen
« Reply #2 on: September 08, 2022, 10:54:17 pm »
 

Offline wilber

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Re: The Queen
« Reply #3 on: September 09, 2022, 09:54:32 am »
The Queen is dead. God save the King.
Queen Elizabeth was the second longest reigning Queen of Canada. I am old enough to remember the day the old King, George IV died and watching the film of the Coronation of the Queen.

She was the longest serving Monarch in British history. Six years longer than Victoria.

I think you mixed up your I's and V's. King George IV died in 1830.

I was 5 when she became Queen but can't say I remember much about her father.

I do remember watching the Coronation. It was a big deal at the time because the film was flown to Canada on a RAF Canberra jet bomber and we got to see it several hours after the actual event. It was the first overseas event televised in North America on the same day.
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Offline Black Dog

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Re: The Queen
« Reply #4 on: September 09, 2022, 10:23:25 am »
Do they bury the corgis with her?

Offline Squidward von Squidderson

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Re: The Queen
« Reply #5 on: September 09, 2022, 10:32:43 am »
Do they bury the corgis with her?

They’re the King’s problem now. 

I’m sure they’re great fox hunters…. Or  they can fetch the polo ball from the net after a goal. 

Offline wilber

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Re: The Queen
« Reply #6 on: September 09, 2022, 10:44:03 am »
Fox hunting was banned in 2005.
"Never trust a man without a single redeeming vice" WSC

Offline Squidward von Squidderson

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Re: The Queen
« Reply #7 on: September 09, 2022, 10:46:47 am »
Fox hunting was banned in 2005.

Can corgies retrieve pheasants then?

Offline Squidward von Squidderson

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Re: The Queen
« Reply #8 on: September 09, 2022, 10:48:37 am »
https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/opendemocracyuk/whats-wrong-with-britain-lets-start-with-the-monarchy/

The Royal family volunteered to pay taxes to Britain on their private enterprises and then hid their assets in tax shelters. LOL

They love money more than they love Britain.

Offline Squidward von Squidderson

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Re: The Queen
« Reply #9 on: September 09, 2022, 10:57:33 am »
Fox hunting was banned in 2005.

Seems Prince Charles, now King, was in quite a tizzy over banning fox hunting.  Compared it to persecution of minorities and said he would leave Britain over it.  Even went so far as writing the PM, which the Monarchy isn’t supposed to do…. get involved in politics and legislating the country. 

https://www.scotsman.com/news/politics/prince-ill-leave-britain-over-fox-hunt-ban-2471612

Offline waldo

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Re: The Queen
« Reply #10 on: September 09, 2022, 11:31:34 am »
guys, guys... this is the 'loyalist' thread; one showing respect and consideration to the crown/monarchy... the other thread is the one for all you d-bags to shyte on the queen and celebrate her death!

carry on!
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Offline waldo

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Re: The Queen
« Reply #11 on: September 09, 2022, 11:40:14 am »
Fun fact:

according to section 41 of the Constitution Act, unanimous agreement among the Senate, House of Commons and the legislative assembly of each province is required to remove the British Crown as the head of state.

Offline waldo

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Re: The Queen
« Reply #12 on: September 09, 2022, 11:55:05 am »
Governor General of Canada: the Role, the Myth, the Legend

Quote
The Governor General of Canada is the representative of Canada's head of state – the Queen.[1] The Constitution Act, 1867 expressly states that the executive branch of Canada’s government is assigned to the Queen and that the Governor General will “[carry] on the Government of Canada on behalf and in the name of the Queen.”[2] Further, the Letters Patent, 1947 – issued by King George VI (the predecessor of Queen Elizabeth II) in 1947 – delegates the monarch's powers in Canada to the Governor General.[3]

The powers of the Governor General

The Constitution Act, 1867 grants extensive powers to the Governor General. These powers include the power to appoint senators and superior court judges, as well as the ability to grant and withhold royal assent to bills (royal assent allows a proposed law to become an actual law).[4] In reality, however, the Governor General’s role in exercising these powers is largely symbolic.[5]

The Governor General’s exercise of powers is mainly symbolic because Canada’s Constitution is comprised of both written and unwritten rules, and the role of the Governor General is governed almost entirely by the unwritten rules of the Constitution. [6] More specifically, constitutional conventions help guide the Governor General’s role – these are “informal rules that bind political actors to behave in a certain way and which are not normally enforceable in the courts.”[7]

For example, while section 55 of the Constitution Act, 1867 gives the Governor General the power to withhold royal assent from a proposed law (which would stop the law from being created), this power has never been exercised.[8] This power is not exercised because withholding royal assent would violate constitutional convention.[9]

The Governor General and “responsible government”

The Governor General has the constitutional responsibility to ensure that the conventions of responsible government are respected.[10] “Responsible government” is a principle that guarantees that the executive branch of government is accountable to the elected representatives in the House of Commons.[11]

The conventions of responsible government require the Governor General to act in accordance with the advice of the prime minister who has the support of the majority of representatives in the House.[12] In practice, this means that the Governor General will almost always act on the prime minister's advice when appointing ministers and proroguing (or suspending) and dissolving Parliament.

The Governor General’s “reserve” powers

While the role of the Governor General is significantly restricted by conventions, it is not entirely symbolic.[13] On rare occasions, a Governor General can exercise personal discretion, meaning that he or she can act independently of prime ministerial advice. This ability to exercise personal discretion revolves around the Governor General's “reserve powers.”[14] Two established reserve powers are the Governor General's authority to refuse a prime minister's request to dissolve Parliament and the right to appoint and dismiss a prime minister.[15]

The Governor General’s reserve powers are necessary for ensuring that the conventions of responsible government are observed. For example, the Governor General’s power to dismiss the prime minister may be necessary in the event that a prime minister violates constitutional convention by refusing to resign after an opposition party obtains a clear majority in a general election.[16] Equally important is the Governor General’s power to appoint a prime minister, which ensures that the Crown always has a prime minister to advise exercises of the Crown’s power and to take responsibility for acts of the Crown before the House of Commons.[17]

Offline BC_cheque

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Re: The Queen
« Reply #13 on: September 09, 2022, 10:50:07 pm »
according to section 41 of the Constitution Act, unanimous agreement among the Senate, House of Commons and the legislative assembly of each province is required to remove the British Crown as the head of state.

I was reading a while ago that Canada has the crown more entrenched in our constitution than in the UK itself. They just need to pass it through parliament but our confederacy is in serious jeopardy trying to come to a unanimous agreement otherwise.

If they decide to abolish that puts us in a precarious situation.


 
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Offline wilber

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Re: The Queen
« Reply #14 on: September 10, 2022, 12:19:21 pm »
I was reading a while ago that Canada has the crown more entrenched in our constitution than in the UK itself. They just need to pass it through parliament but our confederacy is in serious jeopardy trying to come to a unanimous agreement otherwise.

If they decide to abolish that puts us in a precarious situation.

Quote
Amendment by unanimous consent

41 An amendment to the Constitution of Canada in relation to the following matters may be made by proclamation issued by the Governor General under the Great Seal of Canada only where authorized by resolutions of the Senate and House of Commons and of the legislative assembly of each province:

(a) the office of the Queen, the Governor General and the Lieutenant Governor of a province;
"Never trust a man without a single redeeming vice" WSC