Author Topic: Canadian-Aboriginal Culture  (Read 2434 times)

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Offline wilber

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Re: Canadian-Aboriginal Culture
« Reply #30 on: June 26, 2018, 02:59:53 pm »
Clearly they think they can get a better deal.

Who is going to negotiate it and will the province be willing? They are back to square one, or maybe even worse.
"Never trust a man without a single redeeming vice" WSC

Offline the_squid

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Re: Canadian-Aboriginal Culture
« Reply #31 on: June 26, 2018, 03:26:06 pm »
Who is going to negotiate it and will the province be willing? They are back to square one, or maybe even worse.

Not at all....   governments are desperate to get treaties with indigenous people in this province....   the voters may have thought that they should be holding out for more.   I think in the end, they’re probably correct.   Governments aren’t going to come back with a crappier offer....   

Offline TimG

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Re: Canadian-Aboriginal Culture
« Reply #32 on: June 26, 2018, 03:37:19 pm »
Not at all....   governments are desperate to get treaties with indigenous people in this province....   the voters may have thought that they should be holding out for more.   I think in the end, they’re probably correct.   Governments aren’t going to come back with a crappier offer....
Depends. If Canadians get so fed up by incessant demands that they support politicians that push through constitutional changes that limit the liability of current Canadians for past wrongs. You can argue such an event is implausible but 4 years ago most people would have said the same about Trump getting elected and ripping up the post war consensus on trade.

Offline wilber

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Re: Canadian-Aboriginal Culture
« Reply #33 on: June 26, 2018, 03:39:59 pm »
Not at all....   governments are desperate to get treaties with indigenous people in this province....   the voters may have thought that they should be holding out for more.   I think in the end, they’re probably correct.   Governments aren’t going to come back with a crappier offer....

They may not come back with any offer. They made a deal with the band and the members turned it down. Ball is in the band’s court now. The Chief said it is done as far as he is concerned.
"Never trust a man without a single redeeming vice" WSC

Offline kimmy

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Re: Canadian-Aboriginal Culture
« Reply #34 on: June 26, 2018, 11:14:53 pm »
We missed this year but every June we have been spending a couple of weeks at the Nk'Mip campsite just below the cultural centre, enjoying the lake and stocking up on the region's wine. Everything is well run and clean. The band is the biggest employer in the area and hires people of all races. The first time we checked in and were greeted by a Brit was a bit of a surprise. She has now been there for several years.

 For me the most striking thing about my trip there was meeting the native teenagers who were the hosts and dancers and guides at the Desert Cultural Center.  They radiated a tangible sense of pride and purpose.  Teenagers of all races and backgrounds would be lucky to be as poised and confident. You hear about troubled native youth... the young people working at the cultural center are the exact opposite.  Whatever they're doing at Osoyoos, they must be doing it right.

 -k
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Offline MH

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Re: Canadian-Aboriginal Culture
« Reply #35 on: June 27, 2018, 06:40:07 am »
The thing that people don't realize is that in-person encounters are a salve to misunderstanding others.

Mass/national/global media doesn't solve this.  Our camp at BurningMan was like a UN of midWest Republicans, Israeli ultra-liberals, Canadian mushy middle millenials...

The idea of actually DESIGNING communities for cohesion is alien to our idiot government overlords.  Religion and family "took care" of that community aspect in the past but we need to take it upon ourselves now.

Offline wilber

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Re: Canadian-Aboriginal Culture
« Reply #36 on: June 27, 2018, 01:39:08 pm »
For me the most striking thing about my trip there was meeting the native teenagers who were the hosts and dancers and guides at the Desert Cultural Center.  They radiated a tangible sense of pride and purpose.  Teenagers of all races and backgrounds would be lucky to be as poised and confident. You hear about troubled native youth... the young people working at the cultural center are the exact opposite.  Whatever they're doing at Osoyoos, they must be doing it right.

 -k

They have something to be proud of. The Cultural Centre, hotel, winery, restaurants, golf course and campground are all really good. The also have another golf course north of Oliver and have leased land to Area 27, a group which built a race track designed by Jacques Villeneuve for rich boys to play with their supercars, instead of killing people on lower mainland roads.
"Never trust a man without a single redeeming vice" WSC


Offline wilber

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"Never trust a man without a single redeeming vice" WSC

Offline MH

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Re: Canadian-Aboriginal Culture
« Reply #39 on: May 28, 2021, 06:47:49 pm »
I think the place was still open in the late 1970s

Offline Gorgeous Graham

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I can tell how good of a person you are by how you treat the people you disagree with.
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Offline waldo

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Re: Canadian-Aboriginal Culture
« Reply #41 on: May 29, 2021, 01:11:16 am »
I think the place was still open in the late 1970s

Quote
The Kamloops Indian Residential School was in operation from 1890 to 1969, when the federal government took over administration from the Catholic Church to operate it as a residence for a day school, until closing in 1978.

Offline waldo

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Re: Canadian-Aboriginal Culture
« Reply #42 on: May 29, 2021, 02:07:30 am »
the Catholic Church operated ~70% of the 130 residential schools that operated in Canada between the 1880s and 1996... the ~30% remainder were operated by the United Church, the Presbyterian Church and the Anglican Church.

on behalf of Canada, {former} PM Harper issued an official apology to residential school survivors in 2008... the United Church did so in 1998, the Presbyterian Church in 1994 and the Anglican Church in 1993. The Catholic Church has not issued an apology despite it being a 'call to action point' of the findings from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. In the letter refusing an apology for residential schools, Bishop Lionel Gendron, president of the Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops, said while Pope Francis took the matter seriously, he had still decided not to apologize - stating further that he {the Pope} felt that he could not personally respond.

=>2007 settlement:
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The court-approved compensation scheme arose out of a comprehensive class-action settlement in 2007 involving survivors, the federal government and churches that ran the schools. The Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement included a Common Experience Payment for all students who attended the schools, a five-year endowment for the Aboriginal Healing Foundation, and the Independent Assessment Process (IAP) to adjudicate claims from students who had suffered abuse at the schools.

Under the IAP, claimants were entitled to up to $275,000 each, based on the nature and level of abuse suffered.

In all 38,276 claims were received, with Saskatchewan having the most claimants. Adjudicators awarded $2.14 billion in compensation to 23,431 claimants while another 4,415 claimants received compensation directly from the federal government.

Overall, the government paid out $3.23 billion in compensation and other costs. The process itself cost another $411 million.

=> Nov 2017 apology/settlement to residential school survivors in Newfoundland & Labrador (per Macleans):
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Stephen Harper’s 2008 apology to residential school survivors was considered a historic, if largely symbolic, step towards reconciliation with Canada’s First Peoples. In making the gesture, however, Harper failed to acknowledge the Innu, Inuit and NunatuKavut people of Newfoundland and Labrador. Why? Because residential schools in the province were set up before Newfoundland and Labrador joined Confederation. The five residential schools that operated in the province—the last closing in 1980—weren’t federally run, and so the Harper government evidently felt no need to recognize the thousands of survivors who attended them, nor their families or communities.

The decision was seen as a particularly glaring flaw of the apology—one that translated as a distinct lack of sincerity and empathy for Canada’s Indigenous people. A class-action lawsuit ensued and, last year, the Liberal government agreed to distribute $50 million to Indigenous survivors who were left out of the original apology and settlement.

On Friday, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau moved further to make up for the previous government’s omission with a tearful apology delivered to hundreds of former students and their families in Goose Bay. “Saying that we are sorry today is not enough. It will not undo the harm that was done to you. It will not bring back the languages and traditions you lost. It will not take away the isolation and vulnerability you felt when you separated from your families, communities and cultures,” the Prime Minister said. “We share this burden with you by fully accepting our responsibilities—and our failings—as a government and as a country.”

Offline MH

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Re: Canadian-Aboriginal Culture
« Reply #43 on: May 29, 2021, 04:50:21 am »


It continued in another capacity I think...

Offline waldo

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Re: Canadian-Aboriginal Culture
« Reply #44 on: May 30, 2021, 11:21:40 pm »
I think the place was still open in the late 1970s

Quote
The Kamloops Indian Residential School was in operation from 1890 to 1969, when the federal government took over administration from the Catholic Church to operate it as a residence for a day school, until closing in 1978.

It continued in another capacity I think...

yes... and that 'other capacity' is mentioned in the post you're replying to - if you had actually included the original quote!