Author Topic: Addressing climate change  (Read 2299 times)

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Offline the_squid

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Re: Addressing climate change
« Reply #300 on: December 02, 2019, 11:42:34 am »
the height of the sliderails may actually be a good thing... if you are moving something big (like a fridge) the taller siderails would help keep it in the truck.

The slope could be a problem, but it depends on what is being carried and if it needs to be secured.

I find most of what I put in my pickup is hefted over the side.  Or I reach in over the side to grab something. 
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Offline wilber

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Re: Addressing climate change
« Reply #301 on: December 02, 2019, 11:45:07 am »
I find most of what I put in my pickup is hefted over the side.  Or I reach in over the side to grab something.

Yup, always having to lower the tailgate and crawl in through the back to get something at the front would be a real PITA.

I have a couple of 18 inch high step stools that fold flat and tuck in on either side of my bed box, just to make access from the side easier.
« Last Edit: December 02, 2019, 11:55:59 am by wilber »
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Offline ?Impact

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Re: Addressing climate change
« Reply #302 on: December 03, 2019, 06:28:09 pm »
So you think heat retention insulation in a car is the same as structural foam in a racing yacht?

The insulation properties are very similar for foam (r-value per inch). Nano-core is a different story.

Offline ?Impact

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Re: Addressing climate change
« Reply #303 on: December 11, 2019, 02:51:08 pm »
I saw a couple of updates on the cybertruck.

1. Tesla now says that the entry level vehicle ($40k) will slip about a year in schedule, but the high end vehicle (3 motor) will move forward about a year. You can take this how you want. Did they hide this fact and only reveal it a couple of weeks after the product announcement, or did they get market feedback on what was the more important vehicle to focus on. My impression of the pickup market is that the mid-tier is where the big business is. I see far more F-150s than Rangers of F-350 SuperDuty (same for the other manufactures). There was no update on their 2 motor model which one might call the mid-tier.

2. I learned another reason for the body styling. The body is stamped out of a single sheet of stainless steel. While this results in improved reliability (other trucks have a half dozen or more body panels), the downside would be if you ever had to replace it. The big difference however is it allows for both lower manufacturing cost, and significant weight reduction. There are however more constraints in design when you manufacture from a single body panel, instead of many that are interconnected.

Offline wilber

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Re: Addressing climate change
« Reply #304 on: December 11, 2019, 06:03:57 pm »
Pickups are body on frame with the cab separate from the box for a reason. When owners inevitably overload them, it allows the truck to flex in the middle without distorting  the body work. This used to happen with early Honda Ridgelines which had a one piece unit body. New Ridgelines use a subframe between the front and rear unit bodies to allow some flex. People do overload their trucks and that Tesla will need to be extremely stiff to avoid distorted body panels.
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Offline Granny

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Re: Addressing climate change
« Reply #305 on: March 27, 2020, 12:20:07 pm »
Oil Price Crash Opens A Window Of Opportunity For Renewables
https://oilprice.com/Alternative-Energy/Renewable-Energy/Oil-Price-Crash-Opens-A-Window-Of-Opportunity-For-Renewables.html

Just a month ago, companies and investors had a financial incentive to continue investing in new oil and gas projects despite the societal and environmentalist backlash against fossil fuels.    Not anymore.

In just a couple of weeks, the oil price crash made investments in renewable energy starting to look more attractive. Or at least as attractive as investment in oil and gas.
...
At $35 oil, however, the average IRR for oil and gas projects slumps to the renewables return rangeó5 to 10 percent, according to Wood Mackenzie.
...
Unfortunate as this is for Big Oilís just-announced pledges to curb emissions and invest more in alternative energies ... "Even if Big Oil stopped investing in renewables altogether, that would have a minor impact on growth.Ē
 


« Last Edit: March 27, 2020, 12:50:32 pm by Granny »

Offline Gorgeous Graham

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Re: Addressing climate change
« Reply #306 on: March 27, 2020, 12:29:38 pm »
In just a couple of weeks, the oil price crash made investments in renewable energy starting to look more attractive. Or at least as attractive as investment in oil and gas.  [/i]

Oil has never looked less enticing an investment that I can remember.  Oil is $21 a barrel, gas is ridiculously low.  It's not good for the Canadian economy but it could be good for the world, will be interesting to see how renewables do after this virus is gone.  It would be nice to walk downtown in any city and not smell and breath exhaust.
"The economy has been relatively strong but Trudeau has chosen to run deficits year after year & has said will continue to do so well into the future.  This means we'll be in a worse & more vulnerable financial position when a recession hits when we HAVE to run deficits again." - Me, Oct. 3, 2019

Offline the_squid

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Re: Addressing climate change
« Reply #307 on: March 27, 2020, 01:10:41 pm »
Now is the time to tax the crap out of it and put the proceeds towards subsidies for renewables.

Offline Gorgeous Graham

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Re: Addressing climate change
« Reply #308 on: March 27, 2020, 02:06:25 pm »
Now is the time to tax the crap out of it and put the proceeds towards subsidies for renewables.

But then what do we do about trucks, airplanes etc. that currently don't have many if any green options?  And EVs that remain twice as expensive as combustion cars?  And still a lack of EV charging stations etc?  Our businesses wont be able to compete internationally either.
"The economy has been relatively strong but Trudeau has chosen to run deficits year after year & has said will continue to do so well into the future.  This means we'll be in a worse & more vulnerable financial position when a recession hits when we HAVE to run deficits again." - Me, Oct. 3, 2019

Offline the_squid

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Re: Addressing climate change
« Reply #309 on: March 27, 2020, 02:27:19 pm »
But then what do we do about trucks, airplanes etc. that currently don't have many if any green options?

What do they do now?  They pay for fuel.  Iím not under the illusion that everything can go electric. 

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  And EVs that remain twice as expensive as combustion cars? 

You donít think prices for EVs are coming down?

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And still a lack of EV charging stations etc? 

We build them.   ::)


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Our businesses wont be able to compete internationally either.

Businesses that canít compete adapt or die.

Offline Gorgeous Graham

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Re: Addressing climate change
« Reply #310 on: March 27, 2020, 02:38:23 pm »
What do they do now?  They pay for fuel.  Iím not under the illusion that everything can go electric./quote]

If you "tax the crap" out of fuel and certain things can't go renewable right now, what is the point of the tax?  It doesn't provide incentive.  I'm not against a tax, but maybe we should lower or except certain types of fuel.

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Businesses that canít compete adapt or die.

There are no alternatives to gas and EV vehicles, besides horse and buggy.  How do they adapt? How do they compete with other businesses globally in ie: the US.  They can't, so yes they die.

If Canadian goods are more expensive, people won't buy them around the world.  If Canadian businesses are less profitable, people around the world won't invest in them.  This is isn't as easy as it seems.
"The economy has been relatively strong but Trudeau has chosen to run deficits year after year & has said will continue to do so well into the future.  This means we'll be in a worse & more vulnerable financial position when a recession hits when we HAVE to run deficits again." - Me, Oct. 3, 2019

Offline the_squid

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Re: Addressing climate change
« Reply #311 on: March 27, 2020, 02:49:04 pm »
Edit:

Your response was mixed in the quotes and I missed it.



There are no alternatives to gas and EV vehicles, besides horse and buggy.  How do they adapt? How do they compete with other businesses globally in ie: the US.  They can't, so yes they die.

So youíre saying we should have kept horse and buggy when the car came along? 

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If Canadian goods are more expensive, people won't buy them around the world.  If Canadian businesses are less profitable, people around the world won't invest in them.  This is isn't as easy as it seems.

I didnít say it was easy.  Youíre arguing a straw man again.

It will be painful and take time...  probably 2 decades plus to make the transition. 
« Last Edit: March 27, 2020, 04:17:16 pm by the_squid »

Offline Granny

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Re: Addressing climate change
« Reply #312 on: March 27, 2020, 06:03:04 pm »
Oil has never looked less enticing an investment that I can remember.  Oil is $21 a barrel, gas is ridiculously low.  It's not good for the Canadian economy but it could be good for the world, will be interesting to see how renewables do after this virus is gone.  It would be nice to walk downtown in any city and not smell and breath exhaust.

Wow. Got a flashback to Toronto's downtown air [edit]  18+ years ago, and how it cleared after 9/11.

Ya, we can do this better.

We can subsidize workers for transitioning to viable industries, instead of subsidizing multinational profits and GHG's.

If we were not subsidizing fossil fuel profits, investors would be fleeing to renewables for profits.

I think we should just free the electricity energy market and let that happen.

I believe in free enterprise in electricity.
« Last Edit: March 30, 2020, 12:46:06 pm by Granny »

Offline the_squid

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Re: Addressing climate change
« Reply #313 on: March 27, 2020, 06:22:50 pm »
Quote
Got a flashback to Toronto's downtown air 20 years ago, and how it cleared after 9/11.

Why did air quality get better after 9/11?

Offline Granny

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Re: Addressing climate change
« Reply #314 on: March 29, 2020, 03:49:19 pm »
Why did air quality get better after 9/11?

Government + shutdown - everybody went home.

It was silent except for the military airplanes.
I don't remember how many days, but the air cleared, was fresh.