Author Topic: Vulture Culture  (Read 11 times)

Offline kimmy

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Vulture Culture
« on: June 14, 2017, 11:19:08 pm »
Here in Kim Country I often see turkey vultures, especially when I go hiking in the hills. On warm days they soar on the thermal updrafts and glide for hours in long lazy circles, sometimes going so high that they become tiny specks or vanish altogether. Other times, they have come frighteningly close... one time I was hiking along a trail that is very near to the edge of a cliff, and a turkey vulture whooshed up from below and soared just a few meters above my head!

Turkey vulture makes them sound pretty lame, but they are actually beautiful creatures. Some in this area call them "thunderbirds", after the Native American mythological creature. I have no idea if "thunderbird" is a widely accepted name for the turkey vulture, or if it's just a handful of local kooks who use it.  Nevertheless, these large and graceful birds are easily recognizable by their size, their broad and wide wings, and the distinctive pattern on the wings:  black leading edge and wide white trailing edge.




...majestic!

Let's talk about vultures!  What is your favorite kind of vulture?

 -k

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Offline kimmy

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Re: Vulture Culture
« Reply #1 on: June 14, 2017, 11:49:47 pm »
Condors are massive members of the vulture family.

The mighty Andean Condor is among the largest of all flying birds. Just look at those wings!


Pictures of California Condors often show identification tags on the birds' wings. California condors came so close to extinction that extreme measures have been taken to preserve them. Naturalists tag the birds and keep a close eye on them.


This adorable video shows a condor playing with a South American farmer who fostered him when he was an injured chick. This condor is still a growing boy, and is learning to fly!

https://streamable.com/bs270

 -k

Offline MH

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Re: Vulture Culture
« Reply #2 on: June 15, 2017, 04:58:14 am »
Eagles are starting to thrive again.  Where I recreate, on Lake Erie, there used to be one and now there's a small family.  Pigeons should be scared.

Toronto may soon become a spectacular and bloody feeding ground with millions of fat filthy snack birds waddling around our parks waiting to be swooped on.